It's my turn to paint kitchen cabinets - a little advice please?

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Old 05-08-17, 01:24 PM
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It's my turn to paint kitchen cabinets - a little advice please?

I've been wanting a white kitchen for a few years now and finally decided to bite the bullet and do it. I've read the Ideal Cabinet Repaint Sticky as well as Yardnut's recent thread (in addition to many other sites, reviews, etc) and I have a few questions of my own. I'd appreciate any advice.

I will try to attach a few pictures so you can see what I am working with. I hope they are not too dark. I have 27 cabinets and 24 drawers so this is going to be a project!! These are not the best quality cabinets, but they are wood and they are in good condition.

I am looking to have white white (listed twice on purpose). I don't want a paint that is going to yellow over time so that is my primary concern. I'm looking for a recommendation on a top coat as well as a primer coat. Sherwin Williams has paint on sale right now and I'd like to buy my paint now if that is the brand I should go with.

So, here are my questions. Please include specific brands and details in recommendations or I will stand in the store and scratch my head:

1) Cleaning/Prep. I've read to use TSP to clean. Is that sufficient? In the last thread yardnut also used a deglosser. Is that necessary or is cleaning and sanding enough? If deglossing is an important step, what product should be used?

2) Primer. Oil-based or pigmented shellac? Is one better than another given that my goal is white cabinets and I'm starting with this oak color? In yardnut's thread she used Zinsser BIN. Does SWP have a similar product or should I go with an oil-based primer (e.g. SWP ProBlock Primer?)

3) Top Coat. Is there a paint that will not tend toward turning yellow after years on kitchen cabinets? I am open to suggestions and it does not have to be SWP. I have a friend who used SWP ProClassic Interior Acrylic Latex on her cabinets and they came out well. I have also read about SWP ProClassic Waterbased Acrylic-Alkyd. Is that an oil-based that is easier to clean up? I'm trying to understand the difference between this and a regular oil-based paint.

Sorry, for all the newbie questions. I'm trying to take in a lot in a short amount of time. Thanks for any advice.

PS (Floor and countertops will be next!!)
 
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Old 05-08-17, 01:35 PM
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#1 - TSP is an excellent cleaner but must be rinsed well! While I often use it on exteriors [where I can rinse off with a hose or pressure washer] I seldom use it inside. The cabinets should be clean but they don't have to be spotless.

#2 - Either type of primer will do a good job. Pigmented shellac [BIN] has a stronger odor but dries quicker.

#3 - Oil base paints will yellow with age, latex and waterborne paints will not. I'd use SWP's ProClassic Waterborne Enamel. A decent latex enamel [like proclassic] will do a good job, the water borne enamel will dry to a harder finish .... so it should wear better. Cheap latex enamels are prone to chip/peel.
 
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Old 05-08-17, 02:06 PM
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I'm partial to Zinsser primers but I use Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams paint so I would bet an SWP oil based primer would be just fine.

As to the paint, I think either SWP ProClassic or BM Satin Impervo waterborne enamels would be your best choice and it sounds like buying from SWP is on your preferred list anyway.

Mark didn't talk about deglosser but I know he tends to use it in these situations.
 
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Old 05-08-17, 02:34 PM
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Marksr, thanks. If I go into SW and say I want SWP's ProClassic Waterborne Enamel there will be no question what I'm asking for? I don't want to sound like a dumb blonde but sometimes when I go to ask for a product there are three varieties and then I don't know enough to determine which of them I want. So SWP ProClassic Waterbased Acrylic-Alkyd is different than SWO ProClassis Waterborne Enamel? Thanks. This is the advice I am looking for.
 
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Old 05-08-17, 02:39 PM
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Stickshift, thanks. Ok, now I will sound like a dumb blonde. What exactly am I looking for in a deglosser? Can you recommend a brand?
 
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Old 05-08-17, 02:59 PM
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I like to wipe the existing finish down with liquid deglosser as it will clean and [for a short period] soften the existing finish promoting good adhesion. I usually just buy the store brand but 2 of the more well know brands are Liquid Sandpaper and Wilbond.

Before I retired, ProClassic came in waterborne and oil base. Apparently they've relabeled them. I would assume the waterborne acrylic/alkyd is what I've used but can't say for sure
 
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Old 05-08-17, 08:12 PM
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So I went to SW and asked for their ProClassic Waterborne Enamel and he gave me the ProClassic Interior Acrylic Laytex. (see pic below, though I would go with Satin finish). Does that sound right? Is the ProClassic Waterborne Enamel a laytex paint? Sitting right next to it was the other one I asked about, the ProClassic Waterbased Acrylic-Alkyd. He said this is an oil-based hybrid that cleans up with water. I'm okay with a laytex if that is best for the project.

As I was getting ready to check out, a professional painter came in to the store to pick something up and he told me to get the Pro Industrial Waterbased Alkyd Urethane (see pic below, sorry they are sideways). It is $90+ (non contractor price and not on sale) per gallon, but said it is worth the extra cost. I gather it is one of the oil-based hybrids. Is this overkill or worth considering?
 
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Old 05-09-17, 04:47 AM
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I'm not familiar with the Pro Industrial. I've used a good bit of SWP's industrial enamels [the old oil base type] but it sound like the pro industrial is something they came out with after I retired. Usually the pros that come in the store know more than the sales folks and most don't mind giving out good free advice. That said, I think the ProClassic latex will do a good job, the Pro Industrial is probably better but may not be worth the additional cost.
 
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Old 05-10-17, 08:08 PM
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Hi SkiGirl!

Welcome to my world! (At least for that couple of weeks... LOL)

I used this deglosser...

Klean-Strip 1 qt. Easy Liquid Sander-QWN285 - The Home Depot

After I sanded, I wiped down the surfaces with this. Since my cabinets were varnished, I wanted to do everything possible to ensure a good "stick" with the paint. Even though deglosser is also called "liquid sander" it sure does not do any sort of sanding. It just dulls the finish. I would say that sanding is the more critical step, at least it was for my cabinets. I was surprised to see how many varnish drips/bumps were on my cabinets, that I had never even noticed until I cleaned and sanded. I guess that is one benefit of a natural stain or varnished finish - you don't see that!

Even though I am happy with my results, I would not choose the same paint again. Much too drippy! Hopefully you will have an easier time of it with SW paint. Mine was a waterborne paint though - water cleanup - so that was nice.

I decided to use the Zinsser Bin primer as I had pine knots to cover, and even then I had to do 3 coats on some of those doors to cover the knots. I really did not notice much of a smell at all, and the primer was just unbelievably quick-drying.

My favorite paintbrush was the Wooster Shortcut. I love these things - I have used them before and they just work well for me. I also have a thinner brush for trim - but have not used it yet.

Wooster 2 in. Polyester Angle Sash Brush-0Q32110020 - The Home Depot

My cabinets have been completed and up now, for 3 weeks tomorrow. The finish seems very durable/hard now. I am still being careful around them though as this paint takes a few weeks to fully cure.

I too will be doing counters and floors. Man, the counter thing is a helluva process. I have learned so much already. I have a ways to go yet though. Gotta finish this dang wallpaper and get the trim painted. Can't wait to hear your experience!

Good luck!
 

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Old 05-11-17, 04:39 AM
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Even though deglosser is also called "liquid sander" it sure does not do any sort of sanding.
The purpose of liquid deglosser is to clean and soften the oil base finish before you coat over it. Some manufactures will state that it is a liquid sanding but what they really mean is it can take the place of sanding by chemically making the existing finish softer and more receptive to the new coating. This is only short term because after awhile the existing finish will begin to harden back up negating the effects of the deglosser. Mechanical sanding is always better! I like to do both
 
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Old 05-17-17, 02:25 PM
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Been off the radar for a while, but getting ready to start next week. I have been gathering supplies. Thanks for all the advice.

I have a friend who painted white cabinets in the fall and she said after they primed, they noticed gaps in the "seam" where the panel is raised (if that makes sense). They caulked it before putting on the top coat. Has anyone experienced that and should I caulk before priming or just see how it looks after I prime?

The only thing I still need to find are my nickel hinges. I cannot seem to find a match to my current hinges and I need to know if have to fill holes and make new ones or if I can use my current holes. I don't want to start the project until I know that.

I ended up getting SW ProBlock Primer oil based and the SW ProClassic pictured blow but in Satin finish. I'll be "practicing" on my laundry room cabinets first, then moving on to the kitchen.
 
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Old 05-17-17, 02:31 PM
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It depends on how the doors are built. If the panel floats in the frame it shouldn't be caulked. That type of door allows the panel to move with temp and humidity changes. Caulking will result in cracked caulking [if you're lucky] or a cracked panel [if you're not] The other type of door has a fixed panel stapled in place on the back side - that type can and should be caulked prior to applying the finish coat.
 
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Old 05-17-17, 02:43 PM
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Can you tell by my pictures below (the sideways ones) which I have? I'm not sure how to tell. There are these two plastic plug things inside each cabinet on the inside. I assumed I would remove them and the bumpers before sanding and painting. I'm not sure what their purpose is.

Any advice for finding matching hinges? I'm on the hunt for them tomorrow.
 
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Old 05-17-17, 02:59 PM
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I forgot you had pics it looks like you have the panels that float and shouldn't be caulked.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 07:50 PM
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I actually bought my hinges on Amazon - they had the best price, and mine were of a type not available at any of the hardware stores. But I also found them on these sites....

CABINET HINGES | HardwareSource.com

https://www.wwhardware.com/cabinet-hinges

https://www.thehardwarehut.com/cabinet_hinges.php
 
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Old 05-19-17, 09:44 AM
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Thanks. I am having a hard time finding this hinge. Yardnut, one the websites you gave me has a hinge-finder so I've uploaded photos to see if they can help. You also mentioned you did a project once where you painted your hinges...what is involved in that. I'm not sure if that is my next move or if I have to cover holes and start over. This is the only thing holding up my project! Ugh!
 
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Old 05-19-17, 10:43 AM
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It's best not to paint hinges as the moving parts won't stay painted but it will dress up old paint splattered hinges for just a little money.
 
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Old 05-19-17, 07:01 PM
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I did paint the hinges in my bathroom, first, before I found them online, as I did not realize that I could even buy them in a nickle finish. Once I found them, I replaced them. They were fine, but the real deal looked better. I actually do have one kitchen cabinet with painted hinges. It's a "single demountable" and I could not find an exact match for that one, in nickel, so I just went ahead and painted them. I don't think anyone would even notice it but me. I used a spray like this one..

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Valspar-Bru...-12-oz/3729673
 
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Old 05-20-17, 04:39 AM
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I just double checked the hinges on my kitchen cabinets and while the paint has worn some, it's not all that bad - most folks would never notice It's getting where dates allude me but it's been 10 yrs or more since I redid my kitchen.


edit; Our 17 yr old grandson was maybe 2 yrs old when I remodeled the kitchen so the paint on the hinges is at least 15 yrs old.
 
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Old 05-21-17, 08:30 AM
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yardnut - thanks for the reference. Marksr-so you did paint your hinges once upon a time? What paint did you use? A friend has given me a can of Rustoleum Hammered Silver, but I would buy something else if that would do a better job.

I did see a potential hinge online at home depot. I am going to go check it out, either today or tomorrow. I'm not sure the holes are right, but if they are - booyah!
 
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Old 05-21-17, 10:40 AM
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I used a run of the mill spray paint, possibly came from Lowes - don't really remember other than it wasn't anything special, just a dark brown/bronze color. A thin coat is better than a build up of paint because too much paint will wear/chip off as the door is opened/closed.
 
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Old 06-09-17, 03:55 PM
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SkiGirl, any update on your project?
 
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