Will Glidden interior paint+primer mildew resistant clog my hvlp sprayer?

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Old 06-04-17, 09:25 PM
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Will Glidden interior paint+primer mildew resistant clog my hvlp sprayer?

The HD rep said that certain brands of paint are thick and will clog your sprayer.
He said this wasn't one of them.
Just want to confirm before I spray since unclogging a spraygun is a PITD
 
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Old 06-05-17, 04:32 AM
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What is a PITD?

Not all HVLPs are the same but generally they aren't well suited for latex coatings. You might need to thin and/or strain the paint first. What are you painting?
 
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Old 06-05-17, 06:36 AM
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PITD is pain in the ...
I'm painting an interior room.
Would using paint thinner affect the built-in primer since it's paint and primer combined?
 
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Old 06-05-17, 07:02 AM
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Only way I'd be spray painting inside a home is if it was empty, new const. no finished flooring, and even then I'd be using an airless sprayer.
 
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Old 06-05-17, 07:31 AM
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Gotta agree with Joe, the ONLY time spraying an interior makes sense is the initial paint job on a newly constructed home, prior to electrical trim-out and prior to baseboards and door trim installation. Otherwise the few minutes you save in time will be more than consumed in masking and subsequent clean up.

Also, it is the consensus of most professional painters that combined primer-finish paint mixtures are inferior to separate products applied to manufacturer's instructions. The combined products are more for slum lords or slobs trying to do a quickie paint job before selling their house. It doesn't take much of an eye to spot a lousy paint job and rather than enhancing the house it actually detracts, making it harder to sell and it will sell at a lower price than if the original (dirty and stained) paint had been left alone.

And a little story, it may no longer be true, but it might still be true. Some twenty, thirty years ago my daddy and his partner, both professional painters with decades of experience took on a contract job. It was such that spraying made sense so they went to a local tool rental and rented an airless sprayer. Both men were well familiar with commercial and industrial airless sprayers but they soon found out the silly little electric model they rented was a total joke. Maybe the tool rental places have better sprayers these days but maybe not.
 
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Old 06-05-17, 08:02 AM
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I have a sprayer that I use for automotive paint to paint/re-paint my cars. I've used it on my home and I found that not only it uses far less paint, the cleanup is much easier since you don't have drops of paint flying all over the place whenever the roller moves from the pan to the wall/ceiling.

I've done the roller method before and the drips are all over your clothes and the floor and in the end you wind up using 2 gallons of paint or more while the sprayer doesn't even use a full gallon.

This is one area where I'm going to disagree with those more experienced. Maybe a separate prime and paint will give a better look but then the question becomes "will primer clog the sprayer"? (assuming it passes through the strainer)
 
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Old 06-05-17, 08:38 AM
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I'm not a chemist so I can't say for sure but it seems to me the primer/paint combo is more marketing ploy than anything else. Most repaints do not require primer! When a primer is needed, a separate dedicated primer tailored to the need is always better. Minor spot priming with the finish paint is usually acceptable.

I own 2 commercial grade airless pumps along with a good bit of conventional spray guns [air powered] I rarely ever spray inside an occupied dwelling. I normally spray new interiors and some remodel jobs. Overspray can and will travel! If the time spent covering up and cleaning up is too great there is no time savings. If you are saving a noticeable amount of paint by spraying - it's not being applied heavy enough! A thin coat of paint won't wear or touch up well.

You should always use drop cloths [or something] when repainting interiors. Good brush/roller techniques limit the amount of drips.
 
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Old 06-05-17, 09:28 AM
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I have a sprayer that I use for automotive paint to paint/re-paint my cars
There is no way a sprayer for auto paint could work with house paint unless it was thinned to the point of being water color so you are not getting anything on the walls in thickness that will be worth krap.

I've done the roller method before and the drips are all over your clothes and the floor and in the end you wind up using 2 gallons of paint or more while the sprayer doesn't even use a full gallon.
See above, one point to make, Glidden is krappy paint, pretty much anything sold at big box stores is sold for price point, not quality.

Want a paint that doesn't drip go pick up some Pratt & Lambert premium wall paint, it's like $45 a gallon but you wont find a drop on the floor assuming you are using the correct tools.
 
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Old 06-05-17, 09:33 AM
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Glidden is krappy paint, pretty much anything sold at big box stores is sold for price point, not quality.
Glidden makes some fine coatings but you won't find them at the big box store. Most paint manufactures have several lines of paint ranging from bargain basement junk to great coatings. I've used a lot of SWP coatings over the last 25 yrs and while they have great coatings, they also sell some junk that I refused to use!
 
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Old 06-05-17, 10:04 AM
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I think I'll go get rollers and plastic sheeting then.
 
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Old 06-05-17, 11:05 AM
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Cloth is better than plastic! A canvas drop cloth will absorb paint drips but on plastic it takes a long time for the paint to dry and if you step on it and then off of the plastic you're likely to track the paint elsewhere A 4'x10' runner is all you need for walls.
 
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Old 06-05-17, 08:22 PM
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I am not a painter, in fact, I detest painting. But growing up with a father who WAS a professional painter I learned many of the tips and techniques of the trade. It saddens me when I see people that have the attitude of, "Anybody can be a painter!" or, even worse, "Painting is at best a semi-skilled occupation."

Lay people who use masking tape on windows and don't remove it for weeks, months or even years. People that rather than spend ten or twenty dollars (Harbor Freight Tools) for a decent cloth drop cloth that can be used over and over for years opt for the super thin plastic that is slippery, won't stay in place and is rarely even good enough for a single job. People who use the wrong roller nap and/or try to roll the paint on way too fast causing huge globs of paint to be spattered. People who think that a paint brush is simply a paint brush and not using the correct size, shape, type or thickness of the bristles.

Prior to her moving in, my sister told me she wanted to repaint her entire house, top to bottom inside. She thought she and her son could do it in a few days. I just laughed at her and told her she would be lucky to finish in six months. (Note that she is my adopted sister and never met my daddy.) I told her in no uncertain words that painting is a SKILLED trade and not something the average person can pick up reading a magazine article or watching a few programs on HGTV. She finally decided to hire a pro for the downstairs but still thinking she and her son could do the upstairs. The company she hired was a small, husband and wife operation. Pam was (still is) primarily a color consultant while Dave does the majority of the painting. Kate, my sister, was VERY impressed with their work ethic and especially the speed at which the job was being completed. While she and Chris (son) plugged away on one single bedroom, about ten feet square, Dave painted the kitchen, family room, front room and staircase in entirety while the little bedroom was about 50% complete. Dave came upstairs, watched for a few minutes and said, "Let me show you a few tricks." He proceeded to paint the majority of that room in less than an hour. This so impressed Kate that she extended his contract to paint the master bedroom, walk-in closet and master bath as well. All this additional work took maybe a week. Afterwards she stated it was the best money she ever spent.

I have several other stories like that involving different people. To a person every single one of them agreed that hiring a true professional painter (NOT some college student working his way through school or a moonlighting teacher on summer break) was not a cost, it was an investment.
 
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Old 06-06-17, 04:39 AM
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I think a lot of it depends on attitude and desire. IMO most anyone can do a good paint job with a little instruction. Speed comes by repetition! although there is a lot of knowledge most pro painters accumulate over the years which aides in knowing the best plan of attack, coatings and equipment to use.
 
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Old 07-07-17, 05:17 AM
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I have a lot going for me in life with the exception of two things: time and money.
As it applies here I have neither the money to hire a painter who'll do a proper job nor do I have the time to develop the skill myself.
Willing to live with less-than-stellar results.
Thank you
 
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