some trouble with overlap marks


  #1  
Old 07-11-17, 07:34 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 385
Received 5 Likes on 5 Posts
some trouble with overlap marks

I am painting some interior walls with Behr Marquee paint. I have a couple of spots where I can see overlap marks. I think I have some insight into why it happened; it has to do with going back over an area already painted after the paint has begun to dry; in other words, failing on the wet edge concept. I'm wondering whether this issue can be fixed by just painting over the affected areas instead of repainting a whole wall. I can test this idea and, if it doesn't work, then proceed with repainting a wall. But, thought I'd ask whether anyone has found this issue can be corrected without full wall repainting.
 
  #2  
Old 07-11-17, 07:45 PM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 785
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The only time that I had a similar problem was with Glidden. I would stop for lunch & have different shades. Paint over that section but use the W method. Or wait for Marksr.
 
  #3  
Old 07-11-17, 08:09 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 29,429
Received 1,574 Likes on 1,411 Posts
Yes, you will likely need to repaint the entire wall. When painting you have to maintain a wet edge, if you back roll you need to do it quickly before it starts to tack up.

This is not a color problem (shade) , it is a sheen problem (glossiness). The more sheen a paint has, the harder it is to touch up. To get a perfect job, you must cut in and roll and entire wall (so that everything has a wet edge) if you dont want to see variations in sheen.
 
  #4  
Old 07-12-17, 04:20 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,335
Received 702 Likes on 619 Posts
I'm not very familiar with Behr coatings. Some paints touch up real well while other don't. It's possible the 1st coat didn't achieve full coverage. You can try touching it up but if that doesn't work you'd need to repaint that wall.
 
  #5  
Old 07-12-17, 09:48 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,746
Received 997 Likes on 906 Posts
Paint contributes as well as the equipment (roller), in both cases higher quality will always provide a better finish.

But, I suspect it's got a little more to do with application. If it's a short nap roller paint will collect at the edges and leave trails of paint. A thicker nap roller will hold more paint and distribute more evenly.

A 1/2" nap roller is the smallest I will use.

Also, you don't want to paint in the ill advised "W" pattern, you want to paint the entire wall top to bottom in one continuous application to keep that wet edge alive.
 
  #6  
Old 07-12-17, 10:06 AM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 785
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
A 1/2" nap roller is the smallest I will use.
Same here.

you don't want to paint in the ill advised "W" pattern
I generally don't use that pattern. I mentioned it only because there was a problem with the usual top to bottom pattern.
 
  #7  
Old 07-12-17, 11:30 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,217
Received 1,178 Likes on 1,136 Posts
Many people will try to get every last little drop of paint out of the roller before refilling and that can contribute to something like this as well.
 
  #8  
Old 07-12-17, 11:50 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,335
Received 702 Likes on 619 Posts
The W or M pattern worked well years ago when most paints were slow drying oil base, it helped promote better coverage. With today's paints a straight up/down stripe and back rolling the previous stripe works best. Hard to say sight unseen but I suspect it's a coverage issue, either by too much color difference between paints or not enough paint applied.
 
  #9  
Old 07-12-17, 12:25 PM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 785
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Many people will try to get every last little drop of paint out of the roller before refilling
I don't do that either. As soon as the paint starts to get thin, I dip the roller. The more you dip, the faster the job goes.
 
  #10  
Old 07-12-17, 01:48 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 385
Received 5 Likes on 5 Posts
Thanks for the comments, everyone. They are helpful.

The comments about painting in a W pattern vs top-to-bottom were interesting. In the past (generally, many years ago), I used the W pattern and I don't recall problems with it. But, more recently, the technique seems to have become problematic. I wonder why. Actually, only about 2 years ago, I painted a small bedroom using a paint I recall was the cheapest paint in the store. It was flat sheen. Before painting, I primed with primer I had tinted to a color like the actual paint. And, I followed a W pattern in applying the paint. I noticed no issues with overlap marks.

So, I am frustrated to encounter the current issues. Before starting this current project, I watched two youtube videos showing the top-to-bottom (straight down and back up) approach. But then, I saw a video on Behr's website recommending the W technique, so I used used that approach.

Home Depot sells 4 grades of Behr paint and I have the most expensive one, called Marquee. The sheen is eggshell. I have been painting over the old paint. The Behr Marquee paint cans say they guarantee coverage in one coat. And, I find that it does cover well in one coat. But, I also recognize that achieving one-coat success requires vigilance by the painter to cover every square inch well. So, perhaps one aspect of the problem is me being overly cautious to avoid incomplete application over any spots.

I have one section of wall yet to paint. I have some primer (about 1/4 gallon) that was tinted light gray, which is similar to the paint color; it is left over from some painting in a rental property owned by my son. I think I'll use it on this last wall before painting.

I am wondering paints on the market now tend to dry faster than in the past, and whether the trend toward paint & primer in one product is a factor in this regard. My experience with pure primer is that it generally dries faster than pure paint. See the logic here?
 
  #11  
Old 07-12-17, 01:53 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,217
Received 1,178 Likes on 1,136 Posts
You didn't specifically ask but got tangential to these topics so I'll chime in - I have never used a Behr paint of any grade simply because of all the horror stories I've seen in my time here. Better advice and products are found at paint stores than in paint departments.

Additionally, I see primer and paint as having different jobs. Therefore, if a paint truly had primer in it, would it not be both an inferior paint and an inferior primer?
 
  #12  
Old 07-12-17, 02:03 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,335
Received 702 Likes on 619 Posts
While I'm not a chemist and can't prove my theory, I believe primer in the paint is just a marketing ploy [because primer ads have been so effective] The majority of the time a primer is not needed for repaints.

1 coat coverage is tricky as it specifies a minimum mil thickness of the applied paint, not always easy to do in real life. Paint formulations change all the time, sometimes to improve the coating other times to meet gov't regulations.
 
  #13  
Old 07-12-17, 05:08 PM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 785
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I've had good luck with Behr paint. Two paints that I refuse to use are Benjamin Moore Pearl & Glidden. Pearl looks like an iridescent suit. Glidden drys in 2 different colors when you take a break.
 
  #14  
Old 07-13-17, 03:49 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,335
Received 702 Likes on 619 Posts
I don't know that I've used the BM Pearl but I have applied a fair amount of Glidden coatings. They have some great paint but like most paint manufactures they also sell some garbage that isn't fit to use. The latter is what you find at the big box store. Their better coatings will be found at a Glidden store.
 
  #15  
Old 07-13-17, 07:03 AM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 785
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I know that you have more experience than I have but you'll never see me in a Glidden store.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: