Sealer recommendation for kid's table


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Old 07-24-17, 08:27 PM
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Question Sealer recommendation for kid's table

I just bought a small unfinished table that will be an activity table for my kid. The plan is to stain it Weathered Gray (with a little brown mixed in) and then seal it.

My problem is you can fit my sealing experience into a thimble and I always seem to chose the wrong one. So I'm open to recommendations - I'd like something that will potentially stand up against repeated banging from a one-year-old and ideally won't yellow the finish.

Any suggestions are really appreciated!
 
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Old 07-25-17, 04:01 AM
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Oil base poly [or varnish] will deepen the colors naturally in the wood and will yellow over time. Water based poly doesn't change the look any other than give it a sheen and will not yellow. Oil base is more durable than water based. It will take 2-3 coats of poly to get a decent finish, sand and remove dust between coats.
 
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Old 07-25-17, 04:53 AM
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I generally use water based poly. i find it easier to use is to thin to about 50 - 50 mix with water. Spreads well with less bubbles. If you use oil based I do the same but with thinner. My problem with poly is streaks and bubbles thinning it seams to help. may have to use extra coat to get thickness you want.
 
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Old 07-25-17, 05:30 AM
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IMO thinning any coating 50% is too much. Most coating manufactures don't recommend thinning more than 10%. Using a quality brush tailored for the job/coating and sanding between coats goes a long ways toward to eliminating or reducing brush marks. Bubbles in poly are usually caused by either shaking the poly or stirring it over aggressively.
 
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Old 07-25-17, 09:15 AM
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Oil based poly is my go-to finish, applied as Mark relayed. If you're adamant about not changing the color, then water based poly. I don't thin either kind when using.
 
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Old 07-25-17, 11:51 AM
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Cool, thanks for all the helpful info. Since the table top has a larger surface area, you think it would be better to apply with a roller instead of a brush?
 
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Old 07-25-17, 12:36 PM
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I suppose you could. That said, I don't recall ever seeing someone pour poly into a roller pan....

I typically apply with a brush or, on smaller projects, a rag.
 
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Old 07-25-17, 01:02 PM
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Generally a brush will give a nicer finish but those with poor brushing skills often do better with a roller.
 
 

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