Repainting older double hung windows


  #1  
Old 04-28-18, 07:29 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: WI
Posts: 91
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Repainting older double hung windows

I am planning on repainting my bedroom double hung windows that have a little black mold on due to windows sweating in the fall. I've noticed that the some of the substance holding the glass in is missing. Would I need to treat the mold so that it doesn't show through the new paint? What would I need to refill where the substance holding the glass in is missing? Also, some of the paint on the sills is also off down to bare wood. What will I need to do so that this spot isn't noticeable after I paint? Just sand?? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
  #2  
Old 04-28-18, 11:34 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,619
Received 824 Upvotes on 722 Posts
Clean the windows with a bleach solution first, rinse well. The exterior side of the window has glazing that holds the glass in place. I normally scrape off the loose glazing, prime the raw wood and then reglaze as needed once the primer had dried. Many will skip the initial priming but that primer helps the glazing to last longer. All raw wood should be primed.
 
  #3  
Old 04-28-18, 03:39 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,463
Received 128 Upvotes on 113 Posts
If it was mine I'd be measuring and ordering new new replacement windows so I'd never have to go through this again and start saving on heating and cooling cost as soon as there in.
By the time you sand, prime, fix the glazing, repaint I could have replaced most of the windows in the house.
 
  #4  
Old 04-28-18, 05:19 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 10,949
Received 716 Upvotes on 637 Posts
I normally scrape off the loose glazing, prime the raw wood and then reglaze as needed once the primer had dried. Many will skip the initial priming but that primer helps the glazing to last longer. All raw wood should be primed.
I agree with priming the wood. But not the area where the glass sits in or where the glazing is installed. I use linseed oil in those areas. It prevents the wood from drawing out the moisture from the glazing. You then paint the glazing to seal it.

PS... be sure to replace any glazing points that may have fallen out.
 
  #5  
Old 04-29-18, 03:58 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,619
Received 824 Upvotes on 722 Posts
While I've always used oil base primer on any raw wood under the glazing and it allows me to also prime any other bare wood at the same time - I agree boiled linseed oil is good to use under the glazing. It's best to cut linseed oil in half with mineral spirits as that will help it to dry better/quicker.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: