Chalkboard paint application


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Old 03-18-19, 10:24 AM
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Chalkboard paint application

Hi all,

Couldn't find much info on chalkboard paint but I guess my particular question may apply to painting in general. So I'm doing an entire wall with Rustoleum black chalkboard paint. I followed their instructions exactly , including the use of a high density foam roller when applying. That was a disaster; the paint went on very thin, bubbled up everywhere, and had a glossy sheen when it dried.

So I sanded it all down and did a couple of test spots with a fibre roller and an even higher density foam roller. The second foam roller performed exactly as the previous one; hands down, the fibre roller was the better choice and the wall definitely has a chalkboard-like appearance.

Only problem is in those test spots I tried, the overlap strokes really built up and are visibly thicker; I'm worried that once I do a second coat, I'll just be adding onto that and make those spots even higher. I've never tried this before, but would it be a bad idea to attempt to sand down those high spots before doing the second coat? I find this stuff finicky to work with (it's hard to keep each stroke uniform and some other lines are visible as well) so I want to make the second coat as good as possible. I suspect I'll do three coats in total.

Thanks in advance if anyone has worked with this stuff before!
 
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Old 03-18-19, 11:21 AM
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I don't care for foam roller covers! Most any short nap cover should do ok. I'm not sure what you are calling a fibre roller ?? I've only applied chalkboard paint a few times but don't really remember anything about it other than it didn't cover as well as I thought it should.

If you can feel the lap marks/ridges they need to be sanded, if it's just visual another coat or two should make them go away.
 
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Old 03-18-19, 11:43 AM
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Hi Mark,

Thanks for the reply, much appreciated! I think we're talking about the same type of roller, only you're using the correct terminology (after I looked it up). So yes, I have a 6" wide short nap roller that I'm using. I can definitely feel those couple of ridges so will sand them then. I've never sanded paint before, at least in this situation; would a high grit (400+) be better or something lower (say, 220) do you think?

Thanks again, you were very helpful!
Steve
 
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Old 03-18-19, 01:59 PM
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220 grit should be ok. For an entire wall I'd use an 9" roller.
 
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Old 03-18-19, 02:15 PM
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Thanks again, Mark! Much appreciated! If you're a retired painter then I definitely respect your opinion. 220 grit paper and I just found some 9-1/2" lint-free, microfiber, 10mm NAP roller covers. Will use those for successive coats. Thanks!
 
 

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