Painting a wood floor

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Old 10-13-19, 06:18 PM
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Arrow Painting a wood floor

I have a floor with plywood 9" square tile. This is real plywood with real wood veneer finish. I want to clean, sand and paint this floor. What is the likely finish on a floor like this? What are the compatibility concerns when I paint this? In other words suppose it is varnish or lacquer and I use an acrylic paint. Is that a problem? How to solve the problem.
What kind of paint is good for a floor? Can I roll it?

What else ought I to know or what questions have I left unasked?
 
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Old 10-14-19, 02:33 AM
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Assuming a solvent based finished you'd want to either use an oil base primer under latex floor paint or use an oil base floor enamel. I'd lean to the latter because oil enamels dry to a harder film and wear better. It's ok to roll the paint although that might leave some roller stipple that you may or may not mind. It will take at least 2 coats.
 
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Old 10-30-19, 03:28 PM
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Well since my last post I have uncovered the floor after dedoing the lid and painting the walls. A friend looked at it and said I should refinish it with a clear finish, I would like that I just thought it might not be good enough.
HomeDepot has a square buff floor sander. I had thought I would use a rotary buffer. The square buff should get into corners better.
Now the finest sandpaper or sanding screen they have is 120 grit. I have some 180 and 220 on order in sheets sized for this machine. Remember this is veneer plywood and the veneer is pretty thin, I don't think I will take this down to bare wood, only clean it well.

So am I on the right track so far?
Furthermore this is old and I am sure the original finish is solvent based of some kind. Three Sherwin Williams people told me oil base finish is the best for what I am going to do. A painter who was in the store told me the same thing. While I was trying to find sanding screens locally a different paint store told me I should use polyurethane finish, that it is tougher and easier to apply and dries faster.

So I have no experience to go on but I know some of you do.
What is everyone's advice?
Thanks
 
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Old 10-31-19, 03:02 AM
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Hard to say without seeing the floor you have. Normally 120 grit is sufficient prior to applying the first coat of finish although if you intend to use the same sander between coats of poly the finer grits will be good.

Poly comes in both oil base and water based, I'd use the oil base. Water based poly does dry quicker and some of them use a catalyst which makes them pretty much as durable as oil poly. Poly is more durable than varnish or lacquer.
 
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Old 10-31-19, 04:34 AM
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Whatever sander you choose you are going to need more than one. Usually I use three. There is the big one to do the main floor area. Then there is an edger that can get right up to the edge of the straight walls. Then I use a square pad palm sander to get into the corners.

Square sanders tend to be less aggressive and more forgiving so they seem to be the most common for rental. It takes longer to remove the old finish and because they have a non-rigid pad they follow the contours of the floor without leveling it. Rotary drum sanders are more aggressive and can quickly remove the finish and will straighten out or smooth unevenness in your wood... if you operate it properly. That fast acting power comes with a dark side if you don't know what you are doing as it can quickly sand divots or grooves into your floor if you don't operate it properly.
 
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Old 10-31-19, 05:23 AM
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Since this wood floor is a veneer I would not use a drum sander! IF the base board is removed the square sander might get close enough to the wall. Sometimes a scraper is used to get into tight corners to remove the old finish.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 04:42 PM
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I complained a while back about people not letting us know how the project went.
I used the square edge buffer with 180 then 220 grit and got it clean. I did not go through the veneer.
I used oil modified water base polyurethane. This is California where oli based finishes are only sold in quarts at quart prices. I used semi-gloss finish. I am happy with it.
I learned a couple things after the first coat. It sure helps to have a proper applicator.
 
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Old 11-20-19, 02:07 AM
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I'm currently renovating a Victorian house with my boyfriend. I insisted on all floorboards upstairs being on show as the majority were in really good condition.

First, you need to replace any dodgy boards and make sure any 'sticky up' nails are hammered down, We then hired a sander from HSS & stripped them all back. We'd had to replace some boards due to the quality of them (also, where the original fireplaces were, that had been ripped out, were tiles, so we had to replace the wood there too) so, as a consequence, the new wood didn't match the old, stripped back wood. To mask this, we used a woodstain to make all the boards the same colour - we had to go darker than I wanted but we didn't have any choice as we had to get a match - we used one from Ronseal. We then varnished them all with clear varnish. Everything has really clear instructions on them - hell, I did most of the staining & varnishing and I'm a useless at DIY bird!

No matter what people say or how easy DIY shows make it look, it's not - it's bloody hard work - but well worth it - they look great

Unfortunately, the boards downstairs were in very poor condition so we've had used laminate there.
 
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