Semi-gloss Paint Question


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Old 05-23-23, 08:07 AM
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Semi-gloss Paint Question

Greetings All:

Trying to be proactive before painting a bathroom and found a dilemma. I understand that semi-gloss paint has to be lightly sanded or have a bonding primer painted over before new paint can be applied. So while sanding the semi-gloss trim I started wondering if I am going to put 2 or 3 coats over this bathroom does that mean I have to sand or prime between each coat?

The dilemma being that when I painted the underside of my kitchen cabinets I used a bonding primer then did 3 coats of Valspar's lowest end semi-gloss and did not sand between them and at least one coat was done 24hrs after the other. Because it was low end paint I went into the project knowing there would be a need for more that one coat so did the coats thinly with a bush. I have had no issues with the paint and it gets wiped down often because of upsplash from prepping food on the counter underneath.

So did I just luck out with the cabinets? Or was it the fact the paint was so low end it might not have be as semi-glossy? Or maybe it was the fact I used a brush? For this project I'll be using semi-gloss as well from another brands lowest end paint line but will be doing it with a roller and do plan on doing at least 2 coats over a primer. Is there really a need to sand or prime between coats of semi-gloss?

 
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Old 05-23-23, 08:49 AM
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First off I would NEVER recommend a low end/cheap paint. Paint is one of those items you absolutly get what you pay for and why go to all the effort to prep and paint only to see the project fail because you used an inferior top coat.

Paints do not require sanding or primer between coats.
 
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Old 05-23-23, 09:04 AM
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It's always a good idea to scuff sand between coats of paint. There is no need for a primer when applying latex enamel over latex enamel. You do need a primer if you are switching from oil base enamel to latex.
 
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Old 05-23-23, 09:14 AM
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Thanks @Marq1. I've only ever painted with the lower end brand names because they were all I could afford, and have had no issues with them. Because I've had always had wallpaper in my kitchens & baths, my first use with semi-gloss was just a few years ago, and I am not familiar with if it behaved like flat with regards to curing time between coats and really got worried when I did see a search result that actually did recommend sanding between each coat. It was an outlier though so I'm happy to disregard seeing that!
 
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Old 05-23-23, 09:26 AM
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Thanks @marksr. Good to know that search result I found recommending sanding in between was a one valid after all. For me though, the idea of doing all that extra work would dampen any enthusiasm to approach the task of finally painting over this ugly paint color in this house, let alone siphon off the much needed energy to do it.
 
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Old 05-23-23, 10:55 AM
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You don't need to do a hard sand, just scuff it up a little to promote good adhesion and knock off any boogers that might be in the previous finish. Basically just wiping over the old paint with a piece of sandpaper or sanding sponge - doesn't take any real time.
 
 

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