Is this window glazing really good?


  #1  
Old 08-28-23, 01:08 PM
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Is this window glazing really good?

I have to replace glazing on some of my windows. I did some a while ago (canít remember when). I think I used DAP33 at that time, and I think maybe also Sherwin-Williams. But I been reading in a lot of places that Sarco Dual Glaze is the best, and pros really like it.

They say it is also easier to work with than others. That would help me a lot. I am not really great at glazing, to say the least - lol!

Does anyone have any opinions about that stuff?

Any thoughts appreciated!
 
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Old 08-29-23, 05:12 AM
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I don't recall ever using it.
I'm partial to SWP 66 glazing because it's not as oily - keeps my fingers cleaner.
 
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Old 08-29-23, 08:22 AM
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The Sarco Dual Glaze has some boiled linseed oil and turpentine mixed in it.
 

Last edited by Kooter; 08-29-23 at 08:57 AM. Reason: orthography
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Old 08-29-23, 08:47 AM
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Eons ago we used to prime bare window sash with a mixture of boiled linseed oil, turpentine and exterior wood primer. Back then I think Dap 33 was the only glazing available.
 
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Old 08-29-23, 09:49 AM
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@marksr –

Thanks. Yea – I think I was using both DAP33 and SWP66 and I think I liked SWP66 better for some reason. I can remember going out and getting more of the SWP, but not the DAP. Maybe it was for the same reason you point out. Was cleaner to use. I think I read about using linseed oil to prepare the wood, but I don’t think I knew about the turpentine and wood primer. (Maybe I'm thinking of linseed oil for the rabbet? )

@kooter

Thanks. I did notice that turpentine and linseed oil. It’s coming back now (long long ago I used to keep good notes, but in later years I usually forget) but I think I was adding linseed oil to one of the putties because it was too dry and I couldn’t work with it. I guess drying out can happen with any of the putties.

I think maybe I’ll get both SWP66 and Sarco and come back later and give a comparison review here. For what that would be worth – I’m not a pro like marksr, but I try – lol. And I guess the proof would be in the pudding, and I guess it would take time anyway to see how one held up as opposed to the other.

But I could at least give my impression of how it was to work with SWP vs Sarco.
 
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Old 08-29-23, 10:10 AM
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Linseed oil has to be thinned, straight out of the can it doesn't want to dry. Today if I use to use linseed oil I thin it with mineral spirits - turpentine is too expensive. I generally cut in 50% with thinner.
 
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Old 08-29-23, 10:31 AM
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OK - gotcha! Thanks. Did not know that. Turns out I have both mineral spirits and linseed oil on the shelf at my house.
 
 

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