Changing Ford Escape plugs; should I change coil packs too?

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Old 04-28-17, 07:49 PM
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Changing Ford Escape plugs; should I change coil packs too?

My 2009 Escape V6 (120k miles) is 20k overdue for plugs.

Changing the rear bank plugs involves pulling the intake manifold and disconnecting/reconnecting a zillion hoses and wires. Probably half a day job for me if nothing goes south.

This engine has a coil pack for each plug that is right above the plug so it seems like a good idea to replace them while changing out the plugs.

But decent packs are $45 or so each.

Would you change them? If so, any reason not to just change the 3 rear packs (the front ones are trivial to reach)?

The engine runs fine with no problems; just want to keep it that way....
 
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Old 04-28-17, 08:25 PM
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Can't offer much about the coils since I have bought expensive ones and had them fail just as fast as the lesser priced ones. But I always change all of them at the same time. You might want to look up what other folks have done in changing those plugs they may offer some tips to make it a little easier.
 
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Old 04-28-17, 09:17 PM
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Brian (can't think of his user name) out in CA has done this job I believe. He gave me some advice when I was planning to do mine. Something about some seals on the manifold that should be replaced at the same time?

I never got my order of roundtoit's in the mail, so all that got changed were the front 3 plugs at 110K. Sold it with 142K couple of years later, never had any starting problems, misfires, etc. Mine was a 2001 Tribute, but same basic vehicle.
 
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Old 04-28-17, 09:22 PM
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i always do the rear three. that way if the older ones fail they are easy to get to with out taking off intake.
 
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Old 04-29-17, 06:26 AM
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I normally wouldn't suggest preemptively changing the coils but if you plan on keeping it for a couple more years and your time is more valuable than the money it might be worth it. Keep the old coils to swap if the others fo bad.
 
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Old 04-29-17, 08:54 AM
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Thanks Vic and all, I will change the intake manifold gaskets (more like big O-rings really) while I am at it.

I'm leaning towards changing all the plugs but only the back three coils. Good idea to hang on to the old ones.

I generally keep my vehicles until they get really unreliable, so hoping for at least several more years on this one. Have some rust to take care of but otherwise it's still in good shape.
 
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Old 04-29-17, 09:39 AM
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I have a 2003 Escape with 120,000. I changed all coils and plugs. Not that big of job. Also replaced the lower intake gaskets. They were pretty fried and easy to replace. It runs like a new car.
 
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Old 04-30-17, 10:37 AM
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It's a toss really. Things tend to go sour when they are being touched. So I'd say, yes, replace ignition packs and keep old ones just in case.
As of removing intake... That's what the book says. So it said for wife's RX300 and for my now Highlander says to also remove cowl. So it's somewhere between $550-$700 dealer job.
That said, on RX300 I simply removed throttle body and some cables on the opposite side, so that I could get my hands through and to the rear plus. Done it twice, 45 minutes each time. That's $542 pre tax job DIY.
As of Highlander, buddy of mine does them in 30 minutes without removing anything.
Using something like this:
https://store.snapon.com/Ball-Joint-...t-P642285.aspx
So he's up due to do my plugs soon.
What I am saying is - books are great but stand and look at that engine. And size of your hands. Is there something much less labor extensive than intake removal to access those plugs? Can they be accessed from the bottom, actually, if engine is really slanted? Or, all time favorite. Can you simply loosen engine mounts and lower engine few inches, thus opening gap between cowl and valve cover?
As every piece you remove on 120 000 miles engine is destined to leak or else after reinstall.
 
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Old 04-30-17, 11:48 AM
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Will definitely check it out; but usually when there's a cheat there's somebody on video showing how to do it, and all the videos I found show removing the manifold. But I'm all for avoiding the extra effort and potential problems if I can.
 
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Old 04-30-17, 03:58 PM
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Maybe. There was no cheat for RX300. I am proud owner of figuring it out and scratches on hands and forearms. As I have large hands and it was tight! But $542 pre tax is great motivator.

Simple example. Buddy owned Mazda 626 that, to have ATF changed "would require transmission removal" to the tune of around $800. So he set wood block under the oil pan, loosened all mounts and jacked engine up so that there was enough clearance to remove trannie pan with corssmember in place.

Just saying.
 
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Old 05-21-17, 01:15 PM
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Thought I would circle back after actually doing this job. I replaced all six plugs and the back three coil on plug units, plus the big O ring gasket. Took about 3 hours; if I had to do it again it would take maybe an hour.

The upper intake manifold does have to come off. There is at most 1/2" clearance between the bottom of the upper manifold and the top of the rear Coil on plug units, and since they are about 7" long and buried in the engine, the upper manifold has to come off. Good news is that it was easier than I expected. I have a late production 2009 and all the throttle stuff and cruise control are by wire, so there were no mechanical cables to disconnect and get out of the way. There were 5 or 6 harness plugs to disconnect, 3 or 4 hoses, and a total of 10 bolts to remove, not counting the 6 COP hold downs. Nothing was frozen or rusted in place, so it was smooth sailing.

Thanks all for all the suggestions/advice.
 
 

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