Radiator Flush


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Old 03-07-23, 04:19 PM
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Radiator Flush

My wife has a 2008 GMC Yukon 5.3 V8.

A couple of times in the past few months the temp gauge moves back & forth. It normally runs at 210 (more than I think it should but that's where its always run.) So, Saturday she called me & was saying its running up to about 230 & then back. So, I went to see about it. It was a little low on water but It shouldn't be back & forth like that so I'm thinking:
1) Temp sensor
2) Thermostat or
3) maybe just 15 years old, bad radiator /cooling issue.
EDIT: its got two electric fans & both seem to be operating properly.

Drove to town & got flush & a thermostat. They didn't have a sensor so I decided to flush & replace the thermostat & see where we are.
Today, I had time to pour in flush & let it run for an hour. When I went back out to flush & replace thermostat, I noticed a little antifreeze in the bottom of the tray at the bottom of the radiator.
So now, I'm at:
1) radiator with a small hole
2) a leak around the steel lines to the extra cooler/radiator (its a heavy duty Yukon with a towing package etc & extra tranny cooler & coolant system).

So, she is going to take it to a radiator shop that is well known & has been in business for many, many years here with a huge reputation & let them look it over & get it done.

OK, so my question.
I didn't drain & refill the system. Therefore it still has the flush in it. She has to run to town tomorrow but wont get it looked at until probably Monday. The car will sit until then except for going to town tomorrow. Today is Tuesday.

Any harm in the flush staying in the system until she can get the work done in 5 days? Personally, I don't see an issue but I don't know. I ran the car for about an hour today. I'm sure the flush has about run its life cycle.

Advise???
 
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Old 03-08-23, 03:14 AM
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I've run vehicles to town and back with the flush in the system and had no issues, probably a max of 25 miles. Would it be that big of a deal to drain and refill with water?
 
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Old 03-08-23, 04:24 AM
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Thanks Mark.
I could, but then I have to deal with the antifreeze that I drain out of the car. They are going to have to drain it anyway at the shop. If I do it, I've got to store it in something until I can get rid of it. Its just a pain & like I said, they got to drain it anyway. If its not going to hurt anything for it to sit in there for a few days, I'd rather do that than have to mess with the hassle.
We have two little dogs that go outside and I worry about them getting a lick of that off the ground. You know when I pull that hose off, some of its going to splash everywhere. There is no drain plug on this radiator. I'd just prefer to hold off & let the shop deal with it.
 
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Old 03-08-23, 09:49 AM
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Most flushes have some sort of alkali chemical in them. The longer they sit the longer they work. On a healthy cooling system, I doubt there would be an issue. For a marginal system YMMV. An alkali solution will attack zinc, which is used in some radiators. Information to consider.
 
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Old 03-08-23, 10:18 AM
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I would call the radiator shop and ask them. They will have a correct answer for you as that is their business and they know all the facts.
 
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Old 03-08-23, 10:57 AM
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doubt it would hurt anything but there is a lot of different brands not sure what is in them,doubt most radiator shops even use them as there not that effective but in the old days they would be able to rod out and repair radiators not so much anymore due to the construction there likely just going to replace a clogged radiator.
 
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Old 03-08-23, 12:58 PM
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As far as I know our last local radiator shop closed it's door a yr or so ago. And they no longer liked to repair radiators - they always pushed replacement. If it's more than a minor leak I generally just buy a new radiator and install it myself.
 
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Old 03-08-23, 03:31 PM
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I agree Mark. Used to they would unsolder the top & bottom, then set the parts in a vat of muriatic acid for a couple of days, rinse it off, rod it out, then solder it back together. Last I knew of a price was about $40.
Now, just like everything else, they are disposable. I haven't seen an old style radiator shop in 25 or 30 years. I guess they may patch a small hole if it was damaged by an object but I bet if a top or bottom was rotted to any degree, they wouldn't even replace that now days.
The shop that I am taking the car to is an old shop, probably 50+ years old if not older. They now specialize in frontend alignment, but they still have a big radiator business because anyone who has lived here for many years, just goes there.... because its just the place to go.
 
 

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