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replacing bullnose corner bead and adjacent sheet rock

replacing bullnose corner bead and adjacent sheet rock

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  #1  
Old 01-29-17, 02:02 PM
K
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replacing bullnose corner bead and adjacent sheet rock

I am making several repairs prior to having a home painted and to avoid confusion will ask about how to handle three types of drywall repairs. This is probably the most difficult. A picture will be attached showing where I am at.

This is he afteermath of removal of a pony wall that ran from a perimeter wall. A ssection of the 90 degree corner bead had to be replaced and sheet rock was added to close up the hole in the wall. The drywall was ran under the edge of the corner bead and then the bead was nailed through the drywall and into framing. My question is how to finish the mud prior to spraying the bead and mud with primer, after which I plan to texture coat with spray orange peel or a flocker from the HD. ( I will practice first).

As is I have gotten mud on the metal bead and was thinking that I was supposed to apply a thin coat. I am wondering if that is WRONG and the mud should be built up even with the rounded edge of the bead, and the metal part is simply covered with primer, then orange peel, and painted. Should I just carefully sand the mud off of the bead and then primer, followed by texture?

For some reason the pics I post are rotated on there side.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-29-17, 02:20 PM
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The rounded part of a bullnose bead should be completely clean, sanded smooth. Excess gets scraped off with a knife... the rest gets sanded smooth. Not sure if this is what you are asking or what.

Patching in a short piece of corner bead never works well, you generally want to replace the entire length of the bead. If that applies or not I don't know.
 
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Old 01-29-17, 02:26 PM
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Caveat: I'm not a Pro, and this is assuming you didn't use a hot mix.

I leave the corner bead clean. While wet I scrape of any "excess" with my knife. After a while I will take a sponge (prior to a hard set) and clean the bead.

If yours have hard set, you can take your knife (sharp angle) and run it up and down the bead and knock most of the mud off (it'll flake easily). Then take the sponge and clean the bead. It'll come off, just a little harder than when it is "almost" dry.

Don't sand, wet sponge will clean it faster. I also never prime it, the orange peel will cover most of it.

The only sanding is where the mud meets each side of the bead on the walls. Can't tell from your pics, but it's important for the bead to lay correctly that each wall board is cut short under the bead. That is to say, they should not butt up against each other at the 90.
 
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Old 01-29-17, 02:41 PM
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Thanks guys. You both understood what I was trying to get at. I did cut the wall board correctly and I would have replaced the entire corner bead, but it is a 20 foot wall and there was going to have be be a splice. As for sanding, I already tested and it will be no problem, but now I know for the next time. It isn't a hot mix, whatever that is, but all purpose pre-mixed. I am guessing that hot mix is fast drying. As for smoothness, the one side that is hard to see is pretty rough, but I can easily sand that and do a skim coat. Gently scraping with the knife will save some time. A lot of time if there this wasn't such a small job.
 
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Old 01-29-17, 02:54 PM
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I also never prime it
Always prime bare metal, or rust will bleed through. With your mix made a little loose, rest your knife on the metal edge and apply the mix to the wall, allowing it to taper away to nothing. Less sanding that way.
 
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Old 01-30-17, 01:52 PM
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Thanks chandler. Some work around here was done by a contractor and I noted that he didn't bother to use primer, but to be safe I will. Leaning the knife on the edge makes good sense. I have a wide knife I will use for the final coat.
 
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