Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Patching and Plastering
Reload this Page >

Is this drywall behind wainscoting salvagable?

Is this drywall behind wainscoting salvagable?

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-14-18, 12:31 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Is this drywall behind wainscoting salvagable?

Hi all, I'm doing a little basement renovation, and part of the job is removing some old cheap wainscoting that was poorly covered with paint. Removing the wainscoting and adhesive has pulled the paper right off the drywall where the adhesive was applied. I was going to remove as much of the frayed paper as possible, clean up the edges with a razor, sand, paint with primer and then skim coat with mud and see how it turns out.



Am I wasting my time here? Is it going to save me time and sanity to just replace the drywall along the bottom?

I could also replace with better quality (real wood) wainscoting, but that is going to get pretty expensive and still require a lot of time to stain...

Opinions? Advice? Any and all are appreciated!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-14-18, 01:51 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
IMO it's salvageable but you can't use just any primer, it needs to be Zinnser's Gardz or at least an oil base primer. That is needed so the moisture in latex primer or paint along with the joint compound won't cause more paper to lift off of the gypsum core. Some think it's quicker/easier to replace .... I guess a lot is dependent on your skill with a mud knife.

almost forgot welcome to the forums!
 
  #3  
Old 07-14-18, 02:01 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks, marksr! A quick Google search and it turns out the local Menards has Gardz on the shelf...awesome.

As for my skills, I'm no master, so I think I'll do better to skim over the voids left from the glue than I would taping and mudding in new drywall. I'm going to take a shot at one room first to see how I do...I'll know pretty quickly whether or not it's something I can handle.

Thanks for the welcome
 
  #4  
Old 07-14-18, 02:50 PM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,029
Received 74 Votes on 67 Posts
If it was me I would go up 4 feet and cut drywall off. I hate repairing drywall.I find easier to replace and mud fresh stuff.
 
  #5  
Old 07-15-18, 03:11 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
For many folks it's easier to tape and finish new drywall than it is to skim coat. For best results the skim coat needs to be applied evenly - you don't want a bunch of humps/valleys For beginners it's often easier to skim a bunch of small areas rather than try to skim coat the entire wall at once. The biggest mistake a novice will make is applying the mud too thick! Drywall sanding is messy. I'd rather apply an extra coat of mud than do any extra sanding.
 
  #6  
Old 07-15-18, 08:42 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks, gents. I just applied my first coat to my test wall a few minutes ago...it's definitely going to be some work...every little bump or debris or old texture I pass over seems to get in the way of a smooth coat. I'm not trying to skim the whole wall, I would never be able to pull that off. Rather I'm using the 'clean' parts of the wall as a guide to level out the torn paper areas. Thin to win and as clean as possible as I don't want to sand for days and deal with that mess. So far it's going ok...but my appreciation for you guys and your skill continues to grow!
 
  #7  
Old 07-15-18, 10:15 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,637
Received 209 Votes on 185 Posts
It will take a couple of coats to skim the wall. First coat will cover/seal the boogers, second coat will finish it off. A light sanding might help between coats.
 
  #8  
Old 07-15-18, 11:08 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,021
Received 676 Votes on 625 Posts
I just applied my first coat to my test wall a few minutes ago
hope you primed it first like marksr said.
 
  #9  
Old 07-15-18, 02:40 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 493
Received 20 Votes on 18 Posts
For the amount of time and expense your going to spend cleaning these walls up, replacing with new board would be my vote. If your skilled enough to skim these walls to look decent, you more than skilled enough to finish new drywall. After getting the materials to the job for this area your 20 minutes max to get the board up. A few passes to finish the seams and screws and your done.
 
  #10  
Old 07-16-18, 06:18 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You aren't kidding about the time spent...getting the adhesive off and cleaning the walls before priming has not been fun. At this point only out the cost of the can of gardz and some mud. New boards could have saved time, but corners (both inside and out) are my downfall.

I'm almost ready to give the smaller room a second coat, at that point I'll know if it's going to look good enough to pass. So far, the biggest issue is the line where the wainscoting stopped and the texture (sand I think?) above begins. Try as I do to avoid, every time the knife hits and bounces over a that area, the mud picks up a pattern that will require a fair amount of sanding. Hopefully I can hide that seam with a few feathered coats, if not, lesson learned and I'll just hire someone to replace the bottom 4 feet and call it a day.
 
  #11  
Old 07-16-18, 06:30 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
When you sand it's important to use a sanding pole or anything that will hold the sandpaper flat!
If you try to sand with just sandpaper held in your hand it will be difficult to get rid of any high/low spots.
 
  #12  
Old 07-16-18, 06:44 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks! I have a few of the multi grit sanding sponges, but was considering buying some of the screen type sheets and a pole sander...I definitely will now, money well spent I'm sure.
 
  #13  
Old 07-16-18, 06:57 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,021
Received 676 Votes on 625 Posts
Yep, matching the texture is the most difficult part. If it's truly a sand texture, I will just skim the entire wall. If you need to stop skimming at a corner, or ceiling, just mask it off to keep it separate.
 
  #14  
Old 07-16-18, 07:02 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The entire wall...mission creep is real! This job started out as just a simple flooring job, just replacing carpet with LVP. I wonder how long before I'm looking at a new ceiling

Do these work, or are they gimmicky? https://www.menards.com/main/tools-hardware/hand-tools/drywall-tools/hyde-reg-dust-free-vacuum-hand-sander-kit/09165/p-1444433725663-c-8951.htm?tid=-6314094139341999811&ipos=8
 
  #15  
Old 07-16-18, 07:11 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,029
Received 74 Votes on 67 Posts
Never tried one but if it will keep dust down well worth it.
 
  #16  
Old 07-16-18, 07:16 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's what I was thinking...I guess I'll product test this one for the forums and let you know. The last thing I need is a fine layer of dust throughout the entire house...and with my skim coat 'skill', there will be dust...lots of dust.
 
  #17  
Old 07-16-18, 08:43 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
I've never used a vac sander either but they've been around for a long time.
If you are concerned with matching the texture you could just reinstall a chair rail and not worry so much about getting the texture exact below the chair rail.
 
  #18  
Old 07-16-18, 08:59 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's not a bad idea! I think I'll be able to match the texture well enough that only I'll notice any difference, but that edge where it starts and causes all the chatter marks in the mud is the problem. I hadn't planned on chair rail, but if the blending goes south, that might be my fix.

Speaking of the texture...when the time comes, is it best to add the sand to my primer or to the final coat of paint?
 
  #19  
Old 07-16-18, 10:17 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
It's probably easier to control the sand texture after the wall has been primed. Are you sure it' a sand texture [will feel gritty] or is it orange peel. Hard to tell from your pic.
 
  #20  
Old 07-16-18, 11:30 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm pretty sure it's sand from how fine the texture is, but I'll take a better pic tonight and run it past you guys.
 
  #21  
Old 07-16-18, 08:20 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here are a few shots of the texture and one of the progress so far...it's definitely not perfect, but it's not as bad as I thought it would be.

 
  #22  
Old 07-17-18, 03:18 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
You were right - that's sand texture.
 
  #23  
Old 07-24-18, 09:51 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Progress is being made...I'm basically at a point where I'm looking for minor imperfections and spot work to fill voids etc. I must say I'm not all that thrilled with the Gardz product, as I've had many areas bubble up after the first skim coat, which requires cutting out the section deeper into the board and reapplying Gardz...but I'm past that point now, thankfully.

My newest issue is bubbles in the mud. I have spots everywhere that require sanding and reskimming due to tiny bubble voids that are left after I sand. Is there a trick you guys have for avoiding this?
 
  #24  
Old 07-24-18, 03:41 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
Not sure why you had problems with the Gardz ??? it normally works well.
The bubbles are from mixing the mud - it happens, not much you can do. The fix is to apply a thin coat of j/c over those pot marks after you've sanded and removed the dust.
 
  #25  
Old 07-24-18, 03:56 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,021
Received 676 Votes on 625 Posts
I imagine he didn't peel ALL the loose edges off before putting on the gardz. You are bound to miss a few.
 
  #26  
Old 07-24-18, 03:58 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
Just peeling the paper can cause too much to be removed. I always take my utility knife and score the paper so it only gets removed to that point. Obviously if there is still some loose you repeat.
 
  #27  
Old 07-24-18, 04:00 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,021
Received 676 Votes on 625 Posts
I would still rather use oil based primer over gardz anyday.
 
  #28  
Old 07-24-18, 08:38 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The spots that bubbled back up peeled off pretty easily when I cut around them, so I imagine there were layers of paper that had already delaminated but hadn't peeled away yet? I thought Gardz would penetrate and bond those layers a little better than it did, maybe I was expecting too much. Overall it seems to have done its job outside of the small amount of rework.

Thanks for the info on the bubbles, I'll eliminate them with another coat.
 
  #29  
Old 07-25-18, 02:30 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,029
Received 74 Votes on 67 Posts
Good news is you are learning all about applying mud. Bad news is with new boards you would be finished last week.
 
  #30  
Old 08-04-18, 08:20 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Many thanks to all who commented and helped me along the way. It was a crap ton of work, but I'm pretty happy with the results. Maybe someday I'll learn to tape/mud corners and can just replace in the future, but for now, this will do! I just finished the flooring today and all that is left is the moulding and a few areas that need some paint touched up. The texture isn't a perfect match, but you would have to know what I did and have a pretty critical eye to notice. Thanks again, I wouldn't have pulled it off without a few key pieces of knowledge picked up here!

 
  #31  
Old 08-05-18, 02:54 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,029
Received 74 Votes on 67 Posts
Nice job, looks professional.
 
  #32  
Old 08-05-18, 05:08 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,637
Received 209 Votes on 185 Posts
Looks good from where I'm sitting. Nice job!
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: