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Lift and/or scaffolding needed for 13' ceiling?

Lift and/or scaffolding needed for 13' ceiling?

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  #1  
Old 12-11-18, 12:53 PM
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Lift and/or scaffolding needed for 13' ceiling?

I'm getting estimates to drywall a garage with vaulted ceiling (2:12 pitch, 12' at peak) and one company in particular is more than twice what another company quoted because they said they would need to build scaffolding and rent a lift to do the ceiling. This sounds a little overkill for a 12' ceiling. Can't two guys lift a 4x8 sheet of 1/2" drywall into place safely using a couple 8' step ladders? How high do those manual lifts raise? Isn't there a trick to hanging drywall on a vaulted ceiling without scaffolding and a lift? E.g. installing a temporary furring strip on the downhill side to hold half the sheet as you hang each successive coarse? They quoted nearly 10k to drywall a 325 sq ft garage. Insane.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 12:56 PM
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On 9' ceilings I've seen the hangers just use stilts or stand on aluminum benches. Never really noticed how they did cathedral ceilings but would assume a baker's scaffold or two would be all they'd need. Personally I don't see much need for a lift unless you are working solo.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 01:07 PM
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...I could build a 3' high platform out of a few 2x4s and plywood for them to stand on and the highest point would then be 9'.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 01:09 PM
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You'd want to discuss your plans with the hangers [or their boss] first.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 01:10 PM
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You'd want to discuss your plans with the hangers [or their boss] first.
I was being facetious, but I really could do that I suppose. I'd just go with the cheaper quote before I did that though.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 01:14 PM
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Can't two guys lift a 4x8 sheet of 1/2" drywall
Why not use 12 foot sheets to reduce the number of seams?
 
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Old 12-11-18, 01:19 PM
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Can't two guys lift a 4x8 sheet of 1/2" drywall
I missed the 4x8 reference I've hung 4x8 sheets on flat ceilings by myself before although a cathedral ceiling does make it harder to do. I agree if you are paying someone to hang/finish they need to use 12' drywall!
 
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Old 12-11-18, 01:37 PM
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I figured 4x8 sheets would be easier to lift and place. My garage is just over 12' wide, so they'd likely have to cut each sheet back to 10' anyhow, which unfortunately is going to make for several butt joints/seams.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 01:56 PM
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I'd think the drywall guys would prefer 12' boards, should be easier to hang a full sheet from wall to wall than a 4x8 plus a ripper and I know the finisher would prefer full sheets as it makes his job easier. Any 2 guys that hang drywall for a living and have problems handling 12' boards over their heads are in the wrong profession!

sorry I mis read I thought you said it was just under 12', if you are going to have butt joints anyway - maybe 8' boards would be better.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 09:31 AM
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Do installers typically prefer 12' boards for walls as well? Or does it depend on room size and what ultimately results in the fewest butt joints? When I do estimating work, we always spec 4x12 for ceilings and 4x8 for walls. My garage is 25' long, so two 12' sheets would be be a foot shy and result in two butt joints. Three 8' sheets would also be a foot shy, but result in three butt joints, so 12' sheets sound better. I realize I'm probably over thinking this.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 09:44 AM
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I don't think hangers too much care what size the boards are but the finishers do! I've known some to charge extra when there were more joints than there should be.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 10:03 AM
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I don't think hangers too much care what size the boards are but the finishers do! I've known some to charge extra when there were more joints than there should be.
The same crew is hanging and finishing, so I'll just ask what they prefer.

If the ceiling is consistently 12'-1" or under (the walls aren't perfectly square), then could they get away with using 12' boards assuming there was blocking on the ends to screw into couldn't they (there is blocking)? They could split the difference and end up with a 1/2" gap on each side, which would get filled by the 1/2" wall boards. They said they will be gluing each board in addition to screwing it, so I don't think not having any support from the wall boards would be an issue. There is ladder framing on both the left and right sides of the ceiling, if that makes a difference. Seems like it would be even stronger at the ends and make that 1/2" gap even less of a concern.
 

Last edited by mossman; 12-13-18 at 12:17 PM.
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Old 12-18-18, 10:32 AM
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The company I was about to hire just emailed me and said they don't feel comfortable hanging sheetrock this time of year because they are concerned the mud won't cure properly due to the cold weather. I told them the garage is insulated and I can run my propane heater to keep the garage above 60. I could even leave the door open to the house. They still won't do it until Spring. Are they justified in their concerns, or does it sound like these guys are amateurs? Looks like I'll either be requesting a permit extension (for the 3rd time) or doing half of it myself to at least pass inspection in February.
 

Last edited by mossman; 12-18-18 at 11:25 AM.
  #14  
Old 12-18-18, 02:32 PM
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Drywall gets hung all year long and in varying temps. It is important to keep the board and air temp above freezing until the mud has thoroughly dried. .... and it will dry slower in cool temps. Sounds to me like they have other work lined up and don't want to do your small job at this time.
 
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Old 12-30-18, 10:11 AM
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I had another company out to give an estimate, and the guy said he uses all purpose premix (green lid) for the base/tape coat and blue lid for the finishing. It is my understanding that when using fiberglass mesh tape, a setting type compound should be used. Am I wrong?
 
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Old 12-30-18, 01:47 PM
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Green lid is fine if he uses paper tape [preferred] Shortly after the sticky tape came out I saw a lot of failures where it was bedded in with regular joint compound. Are you sure he plans to use the mesh tape?
 
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Old 12-30-18, 07:08 PM
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He actually said he's going to use a different type of tape for the seams. I believe he was referring to ADFORS Fiba-tape. I'll have to look up the tech sheet and see what the manufacturer recommends.
 
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Old 12-31-18, 02:15 AM
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I've never used Fiba tape but have heard good things about it. If I'm not mistaken tightcoat has used it.
 
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Old 01-02-19, 05:51 PM
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Twice tightcoat has tried to respond to this and twice his clumsy finger hit a mystery key that erased everything. Don't confuse FibaFuse with woven mesh tape. The former is a fiberglass scrim and has racking resistance and I think greater tensile strength than paper. I think it is thinner but I have not miked it.
 
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Old 01-02-19, 05:55 PM
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tightcoat uses FibaFuse for repairs an all cases except angles. It can be cut too easily in an angle. Another advantage to FibaFuse is that if the mud is a little shy behind it more can be forced between the fibers to hold it down.
A disadvantage is that the user is handling fiberglass.
tightcoat uses it pretty exclusively with setting compound because he does mostly repairs and wants to do it in a day.
FibaFuse used to be hard to get. Now it is in the big box stores tightcoat visits.
 
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Old 01-02-19, 06:59 PM
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Thanks. I think mossman will give Fibatape a try.
 
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