Replacing electric range with gas


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Old 01-14-15, 02:59 PM
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Replacing electric range with gas

Hi all,

We're looking to replace our range at some point and are leaning towards going gas instead of electric or induction. We like to cook and electric just doesn't have the temperature control that gas has. Induction may be out of our price range.

I am wondering how difficult it is to split off existing gas service that is at our furnace and land it at the range. I am no newbie to running pipe, wire, etc, but is there a reason not to tackle this myself? Does the utility/gas company even need to know I am doing this?

I do my own home electrical and plumbing and I'm sure I could learn this task.

Also, I realize most gas ranges are paired with outside ventilation. Is this a must? The current unit is just a fan above the electric range.

Ideas? Thoughts?

Also, if there is a better forum for this, please move.
 
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Old 01-14-15, 05:24 PM
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I've done this myself. You should tap off the main gas run, usually 3/4 IP. Each appliance should branch off with a reducer tee to 1/2 feed. You should not tap off the 1/2 feed to the furnace. An electric hood with fan (not vented to outside) is most typical. If you can vent to outside, all the more power to you. Shut off you gas flow at the meter, unless they have it wire tied to prevent or notice tampering then they do not need to know (local codes may vary). Typically you want to use black pipe (however, galvanized is OK, regardless of what others might say), and be sure to use the yellow pipe dope (TFE) meant for gas service. Test all fitting with soap test. Relight all pilots (furnace, hot water tank, etc...)
 
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Old 01-14-15, 05:27 PM
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I moved your thread to the plumbing forum as your question directly pertains to gas piping.
 
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Old 01-14-15, 06:39 PM
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galv. is not legal for gas in my area. it can flake and plug gas orifice.
 
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Old 01-14-15, 07:02 PM
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I believe some codes may require venting to the outside with a gas appliance. Between the indoor air quality issues and the moisture from both the gas and the cooling it is something you should include in any case. However, when installing an exhaust appliance, especially if you select a large one, you will need to make sure it does not depressurize the home to where the gas water heater and furnace begin to backdraft.

As for this being a DIY, I personally would have the gas line run by someone who can add the responsibility to their insurance.

Bud
 
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Old 01-15-15, 03:26 AM
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I called my gas company when I was working on gas pipe. I only had galv on hand and at the store at the time. They told me it's OK. The reason you don't use it is because of cost. Local codes may vary but if the gas is properly treated there is no problem. This is a debate that has gone on for over 60 years. I for one have never had a problem.
 
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Old 04-25-16, 03:55 PM
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All-

I'm looking into this again. So I can only see gas line in the corner of the house where the furnace is. I cannot see where it enters the house because the basement has all drywall ceiling (annoying). The furnace is the only gas appliance in the house currently. 3/4" comes in, 90's down along side the furnace. There's a shutoff valve, and the pipe continues down, and it 90's into the furnace with a T that has 1/2 on the 90-side. There is a nipple down from the T that is 3/4", then capped off.

My question are, if I were to tackle this, can I continue off past the T into the furnace or so I have to add a T before the furnace?

The total length to run to where the range would be is probably less than 25' including traveling back up to the basement ceiling.

My idea handling of this would be to run CSST and attach to the bottom of the furnace gas line where the nipple is capped off. Are there restriction on use of CSST?

I really don't see anything that complicated about doing this myself. I realize the insurance implications, but I've soldered copper pipes, done plenty of PVC plumbing, and I'm fairly handly/technical. This doesn't seem like something I need to spend $500+ having a plumber do.

Then again, this is a DIY forum.

My only other dilemma is that the ventilation hood over the current electric range, just recirculates. Most of what I am reading on the web indicates I am not required to have outside ventilating range if it is gas. There is a kitchen window 6 feet from the range. I also don't understand why I would have more ventilation needs than I do with Electric, besides it being easier to burn food.

This range is along an inside wall, and a wall that does not extend to another wall directly above. The only way I can think to make this happen would be to duct up over my cabinets and stub through exterior wall.

Thanks all.
 

Last edited by muzicman82; 04-25-16 at 04:11 PM.
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Old 04-25-16, 04:58 PM
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My idea handling of this would be to run CSST and attach to the bottom of the furnace gas line where the nipple is capped off
Not the pro here but that nipple is a sediment trap and needs to remain there. You should tee off before that point.
 
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Old 04-25-16, 06:41 PM
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Ah, but what about a T there and installing a new nipple for sediment?
 
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Old 04-26-16, 10:45 AM
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I don't know of a code reason it couldn't be attached there, but it doesn't seem very professional. Even when I'm doing a DIY project, I try to complete it professionally, so the next person looking at it doesn't roll their eyes and figure they need to fix/change it.

If I were doing it, I would undo the furnace piping back to the ceiling, add a 3/4" tee there, and branch off to your range with either black iron pipe or CSST.

You do also need to be sure that the 3/4" pipe is sufficient for all your appliances, now including the gas range. I believe in many cases, 3/4" isn't sufficient for a water heater, furnace and range - but I'm not sure. It all depends on the lengths of the piping. The last thing you want is to starve your furnace and create bad combustion.

As for the range hood, I too understand that it's not a code requirement to have it externally vent, but is highly recommended for gas ranges. The process of combustion produces water vapor, CO2, and can possibly produce CO. By having a range hood, you allow all those gases to get pulled out of the house safely. Again, likely not required, but suggested.
 
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Old 04-26-16, 11:03 AM
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I completely agree, though with a fully finished drywall ceiling, it's definitely not easy to work on. I also don't know (or can't see) if there is another gas shutoff inside the house besides the one along side the furnace. There is only about 25' of pipe inside the house now, so *think* 3/4" is sufficient.

I am already planning on venting a new range hood outside. I figure I can do 7-8" diameter up above my cabinets, run about 10ft to the exterior wall, and poke through there. I'll loose a precious cabinet of storage above the hood, but I know it is better.

I can't seem to see what order the existing furnace pipe was installed in. There doesn't seem to be much wiggle room.
 
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Old 04-26-16, 11:56 AM
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I figure I can do 7-8" diameter up above my cabinets, run about 10ft to the exterior wall
You can use 6" through the upper cabinets. Purchase a hood that allows 7" round out the top and use a 7" to 6" round adapter.
That's assuming this isn't a professional/commercial quality hood.
 
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Old 04-26-16, 12:06 PM
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Are you saying go 6" just for aesthetics, storage, etc? Or is there another reason not to use 7-8"? I thought sticking with the duct size of the hood would keep CFMs and noise to their best?
 
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Old 04-26-16, 12:24 PM
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Storage only. Best to stick with the 7". I've been installing them for 16 years and haven't seen an 8". Most quality brands allow 7" round or 3.25 x 10 out the top, the cheaper units offer no options.
 
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Old 04-26-16, 12:52 PM
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I am currently set on a Broan QP3 Evolution Series Convertible. The only thing about the spec sheet that I'm a bit off on is something about the distance from the cooktop to the top of the range hood is to be no more than 30"? My distance is like 33-35" I think.

I was looking at the QP2 as it is less expensive, but given the CFM loss with duct work and bends, and the extra clearance, I'm now leaning towards the QP3. Also, the "rule of thumb" stating that taking the BTU of the range and divide by 100 for CFM spec, that would be like 530 CFM for the Samsung range I'm currently looking at. It's a 5 burner, but it's very unlikely I'd have more than 2 or 3 burners on at any given time.
 
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Old 04-26-16, 01:28 PM
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Each Broan model you mentioned is nice and they are quiet, lighting is nice also.

The 30" rule is for every vent hood or microwave hood. The bottom of the upper cabinet (combustible surface), can be no lower than 30" from the cooking surface. You're fine.
 
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Old 04-26-16, 01:41 PM
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The misleading text from the installation guide says:
The minimum hood distance above cooking surface MUST
NOT BE LESS than 24” (to top of hood).

A maximum of 30” (to top of hood) above cooking surface is
highly recommended for best capture of cooking impurities.


Distances over 30” are at the installer’s and user’s
discretion; providing that the cabinet height permits.
So the distance I have from cooking surface to TOP of hood or BOTTOM of cabinets is 33.5". Given that the hood is 7.25" tall, you would have less than 24" between the bottom of the hood and the cooking surface. So this bit really doesn't make sense.

Also, my cabinets are painted white. My fridge, sink, and dishwasher are stainless. New range will be stainless. Thoughts on making the hood stainless to match appliances or white to match cabinets? I thought it might "disappear" better being white, but match appliances if stainless. Ugh. Decisions.
 
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Old 04-26-16, 02:50 PM
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The minimum hood distance above cooking surface MUST NOT BE LESS than 24” (to top of hood).
This is incorrect and ignore it. Forget about what type of hood you are installing, the 30" rule applies to hanging the cabinets and applies to all hoods.
 
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Old 04-26-16, 02:52 PM
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Haa, ok thanks. I wasn't about to rehang my cabinets anyway.
 
 

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