What are the procedures if i pull a permit on a remodel.

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Old 02-03-16, 05:20 PM
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What are the procedures if i pull a permit on a remodel.

I live in Yucaipa, Ca and I am remodeling my small masterbath. I will be replacing the electrical wiring. It is 40 yrs old. I want to tap into my original hot and cold copper water pipes in my garage with Pex and run it all new to my Bathroom. And install a curbless shower (Kerdi) pan. Which would require a 1" deep cutout in the slab. I feel I am more than capable to do a good job and plan to meet code either way. What would be required of me if I apply for a permit to do this? I also plan to remodel the other bathroom and the living room at a later date. How could this effect the other jobs later?

skeeter
 
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Old 02-03-16, 05:55 PM
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If you want to go for a permit, the best way to do it is to have an architect draw plans & submit them, to the building dept. I did exactly that when I had to build a handicapped accessible bathroom, for my father. I was changing the size & structure so I went for the permit.

If you want a curbless shower for the same reason, consider a 36" door for wheelchair accessibility. Also, a trench drain in front of the shower is important too.
 
  #3  
Old 02-04-16, 12:58 AM
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Depending on the area, building (and other) permits are issued by cities, counties or the state governmental offices overseeing such matters. Different jurisdictions often have different requirements. Depending on the scope (size) of the job a simple hand-drawn sketch by the homeowner with all the required details may be sufficient whereas a bigger or more detailed job may require the services of a licensed architect or engineer who would apply their "stamp" proving they are considered competent to making the design and specifying materials and construction details.

The person who will be doing the work, the homeowner or contractor, would submit the drawings and written specifications to the clerk in the city or county building department where they would be be forwarded to an inspector who then checks the plans for any omissions, makes notes as to construction details and determines the cost of the finished construction. If the omissions or specifications are sorely lacking the drawings will be returned to person "pulling the permit" as "not approved" and request the originator to make the necessary corrections and resubmit. Once approved by the plans inspector the homeowner or contractor will then have to pay the permit fee, which is based on both fixed costs of the administration, a variable cost (based upon complexity) for the plan review and minor corrections made by the plans inspector and then the major part of the permit fee is a percentage of the cost of construction as determined by the plans inspector.

Some jurisdictions charge mightily for permits and others barely charge the actual costs for the inspection of plans and later inspection(s) of the job itself. Be forewarned, construction without a permit, when a permit is required IS often a gross misdemeanor and punishable by fine. The fines are often as high as three times the permit cost and usually every day without the permit is considered a new violation so the fines can increase really fast. Also know that building department inspectors often "cruise the neighborhoods looking for signs of unpermitted work so your chances of getting away without a permit are not all that good. In addition, the inspector has the power to demand that any work done prior to the issuance of the permit be torn out and redone.

Don't EVER talk back to an inspector or do anything to get him/her riled as they have almost all the power. IF you think your inspector is being completely unreasonable sit down and write a polite letter to his/her superior detailing your differences. Most times the inspector will prevail and you will lose so unless it is really a major point it is almost always best to go along with the inspector's wishes.

As for the other projects down the road, they will require new permits when you get close to the time of construction. The work you do on the first project, as long as you do it correctly with the permit and inspections, should have no bearing on subsequent projects. Also, you may need multiple permits for different parts of the same job; a construction permit for the basic work, an electrical permit for electrical, a plumbing permit for the piping and perhaps a mechanical permit for any ductwork or heating/cooling piping. Remember also that most permits are issued for a specific time period, often six months but sometimes a full year.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 03:49 AM
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I would add that you don't necessarily need an architect, you can draw up the plans yourself. As long as your plans show all the pertinent info, the permit office will accept them.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 06:51 AM
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Are you just skimming my posts, Mark? I thought I made it clear in my third sentence that unless it was a complex job that a hand-drawn sketch by the homeowner was sufficient.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 06:55 AM
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I guess it didn't register
 
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Old 02-04-16, 07:12 AM
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It's okay, you're not the first to ignore me and I am quite sure you won't be the last.

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