Grohe rough-in box crooked

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Old 06-17-16, 09:50 PM
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Grohe rough-in box crooked

My contractor installing my new Grohe bath/shower faucet system installed the rough-in box turned slightly counterclockwise (see photo). I asked if the trim handles will still line up at the proper 6 o'clock position. He said it will work fine. I told him even if it works fine and even though it will be buried in the wall, I'm concerned with the aesthetics. Why not do a professional job and line it up properly--it would only take a few minutes. Any thoughts on this? As a homeowner, would you insist it be straightened? As a contractor, would you tell the homeowner to go to hell?
 
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Old 06-17-16, 10:11 PM
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Without knowing how the trim plate is held in place there is no way of knowing if it will be able to be set straight with the rough-in box crooked.

If this is a single handle faucet and the trim plate is round I see no problem. If the trim plate is anything but round AND it is held in place by through-bolts going into tapped holes or stand-offs in the rough-in box then yes, there most likely will be an aesthetic problem with the finished job.
 
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Old 06-17-16, 10:30 PM
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It's a 2 handle faucet. The trim plate is round and snaps on. But you may have misunderstood. I'm talking about the internal aesthetics (that you can't see, but you know in your mind is in there crooked). Even if it lines up perfectly outside, why not have a clean install before closing up the wall? Or am I being too picky?
 
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Old 06-17-16, 10:45 PM
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The important thing is the finished job. Yes, I think you are being too picky worrying about inconsequential matters concerning the rough-in.
 
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Old 06-18-16, 07:33 AM
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Yes, your being too picky as the finished result should look fine. That said, I like to do the best job I can when doing rough ins making sure things are properly installed and set right. That way I do not have to "tweek" things to make them look good on the finish.

I would never tell the homeowner to "to to hell" and if they insisted that something is to be fixed I would fix it to make them happy. You are the customer and you are paying for the work. If you want it fixed, then have them fix it.
 
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Old 06-18-16, 07:38 AM
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I agree with Tolyn. It takes less than a minute to fix it and why have bad relations over that?
 
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Old 06-18-16, 08:01 AM
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IMHO in this case I have to disagree with the thought hat the contractor needs to make it "look right" in a hidden area. You pay a contractor to do a job and as long as the job meets expectations (does it work as expected, does it have the proper aesthetics as intended for use, does it meet code, and is it secured in a proper manner) you have no reason to complain.

Never watch a house being build. You will not believe the number of nails that do not meet their mark. The number of corners that don't match exactly, the number of locations of items that miss the mark by inches. The house still stands and functions as needed.

If a stud is slightly warped does it mean you don't use it for framing? If so you'll pay triple for that house and it take twice as long to build.

I related this story recently. Father-in-law was a helper to a friend who re-built fire gutted homes. Father-in-law was very particular and exacting with his work. Friend told him to build a house not a cabinet. Drive nails in quickly and don't worry if some of them miss the mark. It won't affect the job.

Do your job ahead of time and properly vet out a contractor or plumber or electrician, by investigating previous work or calling the BBB or talking to other customers. If you hire a professional, let them do their job. Yes, check on their work as they go along but don't nit-pick. Hold back payment until job is completed and working to your satisfaction. But don't hover over their shoulder. Would you want your customer or associates looking over your shoulder and critiquing every thing you do?

A slightly askew valve fixture behind the wall and securely fastened is not a problem. He assured you it will look right. If not, don't pay him!

You've all seen the sign in the mechanics shop that read something like:

hourly rate: $40.00
watching us work: $45/HR
giving us advise: $50/hr
 
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Old 06-18-16, 09:30 AM
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This is just one manifestation of overall sloppiness and how the contractor approaches the job. I agree that if itís an hour job to fix it, just move on. But a couple of minutes?? Itís a $500 faucet system going into a $1.5M house, not a nail going into a stud!

And what if I later want to change from the round trim plate to square? Will it still line up? I donít know, so better safe than sorry.

As far as the ďif itís not right, donít pay himĒ philosophy, I prefer ďdo it right the first timeĒ. I hate backtracking and redos.

BTW, I put a similar faucet system in myself in my master bath. Itís not rocket science.
 
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Old 06-18-16, 01:13 PM
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This is just one manifestation of overall sloppiness and how the contractor approaches the job.
All too common. I'm not saying it's alright but if you want perfect, do it yourself.

My wife and I remodeled our kitchen. From ceiling, floor, appliance, plumbing, electrical, cabinets and everything in between. I know I did a better job than a contractor or a pro. I also know many hidden flaws exist. It don't bother me.
 
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Old 06-18-16, 04:13 PM
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I'm concerned that a PEX install is only being secured by 2 of the 4 screws as designed and considering the ease of installing PEX, it is a sloppy job. I don't think you are being picky in asking that this be corrected. I think it is a factor of the sloppy plumbing job and the pipes forcing it out of square. If the wall is not already closed up, he should tear out and do it correctly.
 
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Old 06-19-16, 02:26 PM
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czizzi -- Agreed! I asked him to redo it. He refused. I fired him before the wall went on. I will do it myself.
BTW, this is not the only misalignment. He also put the drain in crooked (drain and overflow don't line up vertically). Will also have to be redone. He still expects full payment.
 
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Old 06-19-16, 04:35 PM
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Also looks like he used shark bite type fittings and paste on the threaded connectors. Has this thing been water tested? I personally am leary of closing ups shark bites inside a wall cavity. There is a special tool to release the pipe from the fittings, let us know if you have it or not.
 
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Old 06-19-16, 08:33 PM
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I have to agree with you on that. I would not put Shark bites in an enclosed wall. I prefer solid copper. Even pex, I'm a bit concerned about.
 
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Old 06-19-16, 09:34 PM
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Yes, he used the SharkBite fittings with the Pex tubing, which he said is within code. Is it?

I do have the removal tool and can remove them easy enough. No it has not been water tested yet. Since I have to redo it, you recommend Pex fittings -- are they code-acceptable? I asked him 2 or 3 times how the quality compares to normal soldered copper. He said it's just as good.

The reason I ask if Pex fittings will be ok is because redoing the job with soldered copper will take a bit more work. It would be much easier to keep the flex tubing for a humble DIY-er.

Yes he did use pipe dope instead of Teflon tape. That's a no-no too??
THanks for all advice!!
 
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Old 06-20-16, 04:27 AM
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Pex pipe and fitting are allowed as well as Shark bite fittings in most places. Check your local codes.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 05:01 AM
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It needs to be water tested once everything is set correctly. The threaded connections are suspect only until tested - I have experienced numerous times that small burrs can cause those threaded connections to not be able to be turned tight enough. I'm also now to the point that I paste and tape threaded connections for an extra layer of protection.

As an FYI, I have seen shark bites leak in the past, so nothing is 100%. The fact that the lower bottom tub spout connection is flexed and under side pressure concerns me with a slip on connection.

Take a wider picture so I can see how he handled both the shower arm stub out and the tub spout stub out.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 08:50 AM
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Actually, the hot and cold water supply lines have been connected (dope/no tape) and the water main is on. The rough-in service stops are in the closed position and have not yet been turned on, flushed, or tested. There are no leaks at the supply line connection sites.
There is no fixed shower head. The shower will be attached to a flexible hose and will sit on a vertical slide bar above the valve trim.
Wider picture attached, which shows more embarrassment for the plumber. Anything but an elegant line routing!
RE: the drain -- the overflow is at 15" on center from wall. The drain line is at 14-1/2". I'd prefer not to have that strain on the abs too. Will I need to cut it out and redo?
Thanks!
 
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Old 06-20-16, 09:45 AM
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The OCD in me says that I would feel a lot more comfortable if you installed a series of 90 degree elbows in all the PEX turns instead of all the big sloppy loops. Water hammer when the water is shut off will make the pipes bump or move. These loops will exacerbate that and any rubbing the pipes do on the wood could eventually lead to a puncture. I would cushion the pipes where ever they pass through wood.

Go to a plumbing supply house and pick up a couple of drop elbow test plugs like this:

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Screw them into the threaded elbows and then turn the water on. Slowly unscrew to let air out of the pipes and let sit several days under pressure through the diverter all the way to the elbows to check for leaks. Leave them in place until your are done tiling and ready to hook up your final trim kits.
 
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Old 06-21-16, 08:55 AM
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Thank you for the tip! I will try that. I'm first going to clean up the framing a bit before remounting the rough-in box.
 
 

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