flexible gas pex (yellow coated)


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Old 07-19-16, 06:15 AM
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flexible gas pex (yellow coated)

I used to use this stuff a long time ago when it first came out. I have a second floor electric stove in my rental. I want to convert it to gas. The only other two gas fixtures are the water heater and furnace. They are right next to the main/meter. I Want to run a flexible line up to the stove right from after the meter and swap it over but its been so long that Id like to find some info on the stuff. I just want to see the sizing to run lengths etc.
Its about a 30-35' run. I figured a 3/4 line should be enough but wanted to be sure. I also was told now they want you to ground the line to the panel. I dont ever remember doing this in the past but the electricians could have been the ones to do it. Black pipe wouldnt really be an option which is prob why this was done elect at the time (years ago).

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-19-16, 07:22 AM
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I believe the stuff you are referring to is CSST (Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing) There are no grounding requirements in the NEC but may be elsewhere do to reports holes forming from lightning strikes.

You will need to make sure CSST is even allowed in your location. I would recommend soft copper but even that is not allowed in some areas.
 
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Old 07-19-16, 07:36 AM
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yes the bonding is for lightning. its allowable in the area. I prefer it over soft copper, which I am NOT sure is allowed.
Im just trying to decide the run size for a stove and whether 1/2 or 3/4 is needed. 1/2 would def be cheaper and MUCH easier to run but im just unsure of the volume needed by the time it reaches the stove from the basement.
 
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Old 07-19-16, 07:47 AM
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I am not a piping guy so I can't really help you there, someone will be by to help later.
What I can do is get things moving by asking for some info:

What is the model of the stove?
Can you post the total max BTU's that stove can do?
 
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Old 07-19-16, 07:52 AM
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i could but I dont have the stove yet lol. this is in the planning stages atm

thanks though
 
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Old 07-19-16, 08:06 AM
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You need to know the btu of the stove in order to size the CSST. There are lots of tables and calculators online to show what size tubing to use.
 
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Old 07-19-16, 08:28 AM
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Its about a 30-35' run. I figured a 3/4 line should be enough but wanted to be sure.
I can't give you the calculations, but 3/4" ran directly from the meter to the new range is good.
I have never seen an inspector fail the installation, except for how it's protected along bottom of joists or rafters.
Once you have a 3/4" stub out behind the range, the only question is the size of the valve and the size of the flex line. From memory, a 1/2" x 48" flex line is good for approximately 75K to 106K BTU.
The valve and flex line can always be changed to 3/4" if needed.
It might not apply in your area, around here the gas company will come out and look at your stub out and the new oven and tell you what size valve and flex line is required. No charge.
 
 

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