Possible to add indoor water valve?


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Old 03-09-17, 09:57 PM
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Possible to add indoor water valve?

Hi all,

I am thinking about buying a cabinet to house my beautiful collection of guitars. The cabinet maker installs a humidifier into their cabinets in order to keep guitar wood in good condition, with the option to connecting to a water line in order to refill the humidifier.

I'm not sure what to call the type of water valve that is used to connect to toilets (if someone could fill me in I'd appreciate it). But I'm wondering if it is possible to add one of those to a finished wall if I know where the water line runs inside the wall?

The photo below is of the wall in question that was taken while it was still unfinished. It is taken from where a shower was installed and I want to install the tap on the other side of the wall, toward the bottom of the wall. The water line I intend to use is toward the left side of the photo (the water line near the center-right of the photo is for a sink).

My idea would be to remove two pieces of sheetrock: one near the shower valve and the other below where I want to place the valve. Then install some sort of T in to the blue PEX and work another piece of PEX through the insulation, connecting the T to the valve.

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Old 03-10-17, 03:06 AM
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Mark where you want valve and have the plumber put a stub out there. After drywall is up you can add the valve. The type of valve will depend on type of humidifier. Have this done now. Is the house finished now? If so yes you could do what you said.
 
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Old 03-10-17, 04:37 AM
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The valves are called stop valves. The valve should be installed after the sheetrock work is done as Pugsi mentioned. You may want to have your plumber leave the stub out a bit longer than usual so it can also go through the side of your cabinet.

In an enclosed cabinet you won't need to add too much moisture to hold the humidity. You could also consider using distilled water in the humidifier to avoid gunking it up with minerals in the water.
 
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Old 03-10-17, 07:26 AM
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Maybe an icemaker box would look better than just an angle stop (which would need to be secured in some way).

Here's a sharkbite box with arrester, but any box would do. The icebox valves are 1/4" tube outlet.
SharkBite 1/2 in. Ice Maker Outlet Box with Water Hammer Arrestor-25033 - The Home Depot

If you want to give me a '57 Strat for my advice, I guess that would be OK
 
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Old 03-10-17, 07:23 PM
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Thanks for the responses.

Yes, the wall (and room) has been completely finished since the photo was taken: insulation, sheetrock, electrical (not in the stud bay where the water line is), mud, paint, the works.

As I said, if I do this, I am thinking I will have to cut out 2 sections of sheetrock: one directly behind where the shower fixture is and one down low where I would put the icemaker box would go (good suggestion, Handyone).

As far as T-ing off of the shower fixture and PEX goes, what would I need to accomplish that? I have to wonder if calling a plumber is strictly necessary for something like this, as it seems I could do the whole job myself if I were to shut off the water main.
 
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Old 03-11-17, 02:55 AM
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Yes you could do it fairly simply. Use a sharkbite T. Run it to where you want water put valve there. Sharkbite fittings so you don't need to buy a expensive tool. Yes 2 holes in drywall. I like cutting drywall from stud to stud so you have something to screw patch to.
 
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Old 03-12-17, 06:17 PM
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I have one of these. Would it be okay to use that or should I get a specialty PEX cutter?
 
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Old 03-12-17, 07:01 PM
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That's what I use, you can cut pretty square with it.
 
 

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