reducing gas line for stove

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Old 04-25-17, 10:43 PM
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reducing gas line for stove

hello,

I have a stove that's being moved and thus the black pipe. The problem is that where it's going, it's not very accessible to deal with blackpipe fittings. So my plan was to use CSST and do the necessary grounding etc. My question is, since the black pipe is 3/4", does it matter where I reduce it down to 1/2"? Meaning, I can reduce it at an easy spot and then run 1/2" csst the remaining 10 feet and into the stove, or do I need to run the 3/4" all the way to the stove and then reduce it to 1/2"?

The Range manual specifies the following:
http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/co...EN-MES-CFR.pdf
This range is designed to operate at a pressure of 5 in (13 cm) of water column
on natural gas or 10 in (25 cm) of water column on LP gas (propane or butane).
Make sure you are supplying your range with the type of gas for which it is designed.
Do not attempt to convert the appliance from the gas specified in this manual
to a different gas without consulting the gas supplier.
This range is convertible for use on natural or propane gas. If you decide to use this
range on LP gas, conversion must be made by a qualified LP installer before attempting
to operate the range.
For proper operation, the pressure of natural gas supplied to the regulator must be
between 5 in and 13 in (13 cm and 33 cm) of water column.
For LP gas, the pressure supplied must be between 10 in and 13 in (25 cm and 33 cm)
of water column.
When checking for proper operation of the regulator, the inlet pressure must be at least
1 in (2.5 cm) greater than the operating (manifold) pressure as given.
The pressure regulator located at the inlet of the range manifold must remain in the
supply line regardless of whether natural or LP gas is being used.
A flexible-metal appliance connector used to connect the range to the gas supply
line should have an I.D. of 0.5 in (1.3 cm) and be 5 ft (152 cm) in length for ease of
installation. In Canada, flexible connectors must be single-wall metal connectors no
longer than 6 ft (183 cm) in length.
Do not kink or damage the flexible metal tubing when moving the range.
 
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Old 04-25-17, 11:35 PM
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Since your oven is a slide-in I would recommend 3/4" all the way. Slide-ins are usually high performance and maybe convection.

I don't know the calculations but from my experience inspectors want to see the 3/4" stub out and it's reduced at that point by a valve. The range also has a 1/2" NPT inlet, so you are only reducing about 4 feet from valve to range inlet.

I believe a 1/2" x 48" flex line delivers about 106,000 BTU.
 
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Old 04-26-17, 04:29 PM
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the oven does have convection.

I liked the price of the 1/2" vs 3/4" gsst better haha. Little surprised at the cost of that stuff compared to what black pipe is. Wish one of the big box stores sold it by the foot instead of a 25 ft roll as it's at least 2x more than i need.

But thanks for the info, I appreciate it. I'll work on getting the 3/4" all the way up to the stub.
 
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Old 04-26-17, 04:41 PM
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Thanks. When you stick a prime rib in your new convection oven it will all be worth it!
 
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