Why is primer and cement not working but red hot blue is working

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Old 05-15-17, 08:45 AM
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Why is primer and cement not working but red hot blue is working

So yesterday I had this pipe burst in my yard. I never fixed a pipe in my life but I heard how people do it. Went to home depot bought this

8 oz. PVC Handy Pack Purple Primer and Solvent Cement-302483 - The Home Depot

I first used primer and wait 10 seconds and then cement. I tried probably 10 times but it never worked.

Everytime I turned on the water, the water was coming out of the leak again.

Called a handyman, emergency situation because this is the main pipe. Wife complaining there is no water. So pay him handsome money.

But he fixed in 2 minutes using this

Christy's 16oz Red Hot Blue Glue - Plastic Cements & Cleaners - Ace Hardware

He even claimed this solution works even the pipe has water on it so he did not even clean it.

I will buy the same solution and then some pipe and connectors and just want to try out for nothing. I am really curious.

Anybody wants to comment?
 
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Old 05-15-17, 08:55 AM
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How long did you let the cement cure before turning the water back on? You usually need to wait an hour or two for the cement to cure before you turn the water back on. [unless you use a quick setting cement]
 
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Old 05-15-17, 09:00 AM
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Oh well I waited for 1 minute

So I see where the problem is

But the guy using the red hot blue thing, he waited only 20 seconds

So why would anyone use the primer and cement then? red hot blue seems like a much better choice with same price
 
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Old 05-15-17, 09:40 AM
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For anything that has rapid set time, quick dry, instant, do it now material there is usually a downside in that the bond is not as strong, it wont hold as much or it doesn't shine as much.

If the pipe comes apart due to the quick setting adhesive, the handy man just gets another service call!
 
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Old 05-15-17, 10:06 AM
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What type of pipe were you repairing? I hope PVC since that's the glue you linked.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 10:20 AM
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For anything that has rapid set time, quick dry, instant, do it now material there is usually a downside in that the bond is not as strong, it wont hold as much or it doesn't shine as much.

If the pipe comes apart due to the quick setting adhesive, the handy man just gets another service call!
I did not know that. The handyman claimed it is much stronger than prime+cement combination I had

So if I used primer+cement, then I had to wait 1 hour? Then turn on the water?

What do you guys usually use? 1 hour is not much I can wait. But I am confused since the home depot guy said most people buy red hot blue thing
 
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Old 05-15-17, 10:23 AM
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What type of pipe were you repairing? I hope PVC since that's the glue you linked.
Yes it is PVC

What is your choice? red hot blue or primer+cement?
 
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Old 05-15-17, 10:48 AM
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Ok so first it is great that things are back to normal.

It looks to me like the primer/glue that you used may be the wrong type. If the "PVC" was a SUPPLY LINE" then it's typically CPVC, not PVC. The primer and glue are different for each type. The photo you showed was for "regular PVC" and is typically for waste and vent lines - not supply lines.

I suspect - but am not entirely sure - that the "blue glue" may also not be technically correct for use with CPVC. I'm very good at plumbing but we don't use CPVC in our area at all. It's usually for much warmer climates.

Good luck!
 
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Old 05-15-17, 10:55 AM
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Ok so first it is great that things are back to normal.

It looks to me like the primer/glue that you used may be the wrong type. If the "PVC" was a SUPPLY LINE" then it's typically CPVC, not PVC. The primer and glue are different for each type. The photo you showed was for "regular PVC" and is typically for waste and vent lines - not supply lines.

I suspect - but am not entirely sure - that the "blue glue" may also not be technically correct for use with CPVC. I'm very good at plumbing but we don't use CPVC in our area at all. It's usually for much warmer climates.

Good luck!
I am totally confused

I just picked up whatever Home depot guy told me to pick up

But the picture that I gave earlier is what I got. I do not have CPVC My pipes are all PVC

Obviously I am doing something wrong. I want to know what I am doing wrong.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 10:59 AM
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I checked the website for the primer and cement I used here is what it says

•Designed for use with PVC pipe and fittings
•Primer pre-softens pipe and fitting surfaces
•Solvent cement bonds pipe and fittings
•Recommended for use in non-pressure pipe systems
•Suitable for use with Sch. 40 and Sch. 80 pipe

So I was not supposed to use this because not designed for pressure which I needed?
 
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Old 05-15-17, 11:09 AM
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I just picked up whatever Home depot guy told me to pick up
That can be a big mistake. After using regular cement I have always waited 12-24 hrs. Never occurred to wait less.
•Recommended for use in non-pressure pipe systems
New one on me. Never seen cement for drain connections only. Probably bad wording by whoever wrote the copy. What specifically did you buy?
 
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Old 05-15-17, 12:42 PM
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Ok now I'M CONFUSED. So this is a vertical or horizontal WASTE LINE from your sink/shower/toilet that is leaking? Sorry but I totally assumed from what you wrote that the PVC pipes were supply lines and therefore under pressure, and therefore surely must be CPVC.

Waste lines are not under pressure and they are just standard PVC (not CPVC): 1.5", 2", 3", 4". For that, the original primer and glue would be correct.

Would you please be so kind and post a few photos of the actual areas of the pipe, fittings, and leaking area that you are working with? Maybe we're all just kinda "missing the picture" (pun intended).

While we're on the subject, and sorry for asking - does the fitting/pipe have the proper pitch for it's size? Just kinda thinking that if there is backward pitch in a section, then you'd have water sitting there that wants to find a way out, instead of "going with the flow".

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-15-17, 12:51 PM
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I thought it was a water line since he wrote:
Everytime I turned on the water, the water was coming out of the leak again.
You don't normally turn off the water to fix a drain line.

Jefferson wrote:
and therefore surely must be CPVC.
Actually PVC can and is used for cold water in some areas. CPVC is required for hot water because of the max water temperature for PVC.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 01:18 PM
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Actually PVC can and is used for cold water in some areas. CPVC is required for hot water because of the max water temperature for PVC.

Wow! No kidding? Ok well I just learned something. Perhaps our climate precludes the option. I'll step out of this as I'm not going to add any value. Here, PVC is just for waste / vent / septic lines.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 01:31 PM
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Sounds like the pipe wasn't cleaned enough or had some moisture still on it. I have used that cement on supply lines and turned it on only minutes after gluing and never had one leak or come apart. I also have never used primer with complete success so far. The one thing I would like to share is I have found a way to keep that darn glue from drying out in the can, I put the can in a food saver bag and vacuum seal it. I have had the same can of glue going on 2 years and it is still as good as new every time I use it. I know the glue is cheap but I got tired of finding it dried up when I needed to use it, not any more!
 
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Old 05-15-17, 01:32 PM
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Just to avoid confusion I was trying to install back flow preventer see below for the picture
 
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Old 05-15-17, 01:34 PM
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PVC is just for waste / vent / septic lines.
Out in our neck of the woods ABS is used for DWV pipes.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 01:35 PM
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Sounds like the pipe wasn't cleaned enough or had some moisture still on it. I have used that cement on supply lines and turned it on only minutes after gluing and never had one leak or come apart. I also have never used primer with complete success so far. The one thing I would like to share is I have found a way to keep that darn glue from drying out in the can, I put the can in a food saver bag and vacuum seal it. I have had the same can of glue going on 2 years and it is still as good as new every time I use it. I know the glue is cheap but I got tired of finding it dried up when I needed to use it, not any more!
Well that is where I am confused

The handyman came and in 1 second put the blue liquid in and around the pipe although the pipe was wet all over he did not even wipe or clean or sand it.

10 seconds later he turned on the water off we go. No leaks

He used the Chrystie's red hot blue glue
 
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Old 05-15-17, 01:52 PM
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Chrystie's red hot blue glue is for wet conditions the one you used is not.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 02:13 PM
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Chrystie's red hot blue glue is for wet conditions the one you used is not.
So if I am working in wet conditions then I have to use Chrystie's red hot blue glue

especially sprinkler system right?
 
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Old 05-15-17, 02:19 PM
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Out in our neck of the woods ABS is used for DWV pipes.
Another one of those regional things. Here it is mostly PVC drains.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 02:23 PM
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So if I am working in wet conditions then I have to use Chrystie's red hot blue glue

especially sprinkler system right?
Or just make sure what your gluing is clean and dry and use what you already have.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 02:36 PM
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When you glued the pipes did you push them to the bottom of the socket in the fitting and then hold them for a half-minute or so? If you do not hold them until the initial set they often push themselves back out of the socket.
 
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Old 05-15-17, 06:59 PM
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PVC is typ not rated for use in service lines, think to the house, but is ok for interior service use unless restricted.

Conventional PVC cement needs at least 30 min to fully set up.
 
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Old 05-16-17, 04:11 AM
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Marq, unless I mis understand what you wrote - PVC is the standard [at least in the south] for the service line from the meter to the house. Has been for about 40 yrs. Whether or not it's allowed for interior cold lines depends on local codes. CPVC is allowed for both hot and cold inside.
 
 

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