City water


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Old 07-01-17, 02:41 PM
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City water

Hi all
After forever with well water we had the opportunity to install city water.All is ok. Interesting story. After a while, I started seeing dampness near the DHW heater.. After some observation, I saw the HW safety valve dripping, and replaced it. That one leaked also. I mentioned it to a plumber friend, an he said that the water company now installs check valves at the meter, to protect the system, and as a result the expansion of the HW in the heater has go somewhere, so it goes through the safety valve. So I put in a small expansion tank, and it took care of the problem. Just passing it on.
Sid
 
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Old 07-01-17, 02:52 PM
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Did you leave the well in tact just in case you want to make a quick switch?
 
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Old 07-01-17, 03:01 PM
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Most areas require a pressure tank for the water heater as part of their plumbing code. Also, most municipal water systems now require a pressure reducing valve (PRV) between the water meter and the home. So, both are very commonly installed.
 
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Old 07-02-17, 08:57 AM
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I have my irrigation well still running, so yeah I have a backup in case the stuff hits the fan, andI also have a hand pump.
Yeah I am aware that some people install pressure reducers, I think in some cases sold by some contractors for a few extra bucks.
I have a small condo in FL, I am on the 8th floor in a 12 floor bldg. The city water comes in at around 50 psi, and to get it up to the 12th floor,to get to to do any work there is a booster system that pumps it to about 100 psi . And that is for the whole system top to bottom. so on the first and some of the other lower floors when they open a faucet you get 100 pounds. Some people throttle down the service valve to reduce the flow a bit. I always think about the HW heaters. I saw one that lasted 18, or 20 years, They can flood a floor or one or two stacks quite quickly. But the moat leaks come from Ice makers with the plastic water connections. There has been talk about putting pressure reducers on the first 5 floors. The buildings are 30 plus years old, and most of the buildings in Fl are the same.
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