Connecting frost free sillcock to copper


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Old 01-18-18, 07:58 PM
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Connecting frost free sillcock to copper

Changing from regular sillcock to frost free, so there is no current connector in place on the 1/2" supply line. Without soldering, I've got a couple options. I can get a push-on (Sharkbite) fitting with female threads and screw the male sillcock into that, or I can order the sillcock with a compression connection and put it directly onto the supply line. I'm leaning toward the compression connection. Anyone see any reason for one over the other?
 
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Old 01-19-18, 05:43 AM
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I would use the compression fitting. Shark Bite fittings work well but they only have one O ring inside to form the water tight seal so I'm slightly hesitant about their long term survivability.
 
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Old 01-20-18, 03:15 PM
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OK, well I guess I've got an overwhelming majority of 1 supporting me on the compression option! I'm a little leery of the Sharkbite long term too. Am I correct in understanding that the CM inlet type is a compression fitting like I'm thinking it is? This is from Woodford's literature:
 
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Old 01-20-18, 04:42 PM
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I would not hesitate at all to install a sharkbite fitting. They are approved for in-wall use whereas a compression fitting is not.
I have seen all kinds of leaks, but none from a push on fitting.

That said, the CM is correct. Be careful to not over tighten.
Cut the copper square and sand it lightly. Tighten the compression nut until the ferrule just grabs the pipe and then tighten 1/2 turn or less and check for leaks.
It only takes a little bit of torque to seal a compression fitting. Once you over tighten there is no going back and it will leak.
 
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Old 01-20-18, 05:12 PM
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Thanks, I appreciate your opinion on the push-on fitting. If I go with the compression though, where do I put the other wrench while I tighten down the compression nut? I guess that ring behind the threads in the illustration provides flats to put a wrench on? Looks kind of roundish though...
 
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Old 01-20-18, 05:20 PM
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While you're under there, you might consider adding a shut off valve if there isn't one. Also, make sure the sillcock is good and secure, there's been plenty of damaged pipes by the sillcock twisting.

Btw...that another plus for the Sharkbite...the pipe can spin in the connection if twisted.
 
 

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