How to add a refrigerator water line to existing CPVC water line?


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Old 07-09-18, 08:38 PM
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Question How to add a refrigerator water line to existing CPVC water line?

Hello, I want add a refrigerator with ice maker to my basement. I need to install a water line to my current CPVC pipes. The location I want to install this is about 10' from the main inlet line into the house. My house / CPVC is about 17 years old. I've read not to use a saddle, so can you offer any suggestions for the safest and most reliable way to install this? Thanks. - Rick



 
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Old 07-09-18, 10:10 PM
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Although it's not the least expensive way to go..... A SharkBite fitting will make the job fairly easy.

SharkBite-24985A-Service-Compression-Connection-for-Icemaker
 
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Old 07-09-18, 11:59 PM
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Is that a gas line without a valve in the image?
 
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Old 07-10-18, 01:20 AM
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Install a T, run it to the desired location and yes a valve should be installed on the end of the water line also!
 
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Old 07-10-18, 04:10 PM
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PJmax, I researched your advise on the Sharkbite and that looks like the right solution. Thank you!

One thing though, I've read about CPVC becoming brittle. Mine is between 15-20 years old. Should I be concerned about mine splitting or cracking when I try to cut it? I'll be using a ratcheting PVC cutter.

Steve_gro, yes that's a natural gas line with no valve. I'm not familiar with plumbing codes, so not sure if that's a no go, but I noticed I have them in multiple locations.
 
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Old 07-11-18, 10:03 AM
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I think you'll be fine with a ratcheting cutter. Go slow and it should cut fine.

If you're worried, you could use a fine-toothed sawzall, but I'd be more worried that you'll end up shaking the pipe and cracking it that way.


The yellow-coated gas pipe looks like CSST, so there's likely (hopefully) a valve on the other end before it connects to the appliance. But that's probably another project/thread.
 
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Old 07-11-18, 11:45 AM
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Zorfdt, Great answer. Thank you!

As for the gas lines, they do all have valves on the other ends.
 
 

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