Converting copper to PEX laundry room


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Old 12-30-18, 02:34 PM
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Converting copper to PEX laundry room

I'm finishing a basement laundry room this winter. The only supply lines I need to swap from copper to pex is for the washer, sink, and an outside spigot. The current setup is a 1/2 inch copper line which is then branched further down the line for the washer, sink, and spigot.

I was thinking of installing a manifold or multi tee system at the beginning of the existing 1/2 copper run and run 1/2 pex lines to the washer, sink, etc.
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Most manifolds I see are 3/4 input, so would using a reducer to get the existing 1/2 copper to the 3/4 manifold input be an issue?

If instead I decided to just use all 1/2 trunk and branch pex, would I notice a noticeable loss in pressure or volume (due to the difference in ID) ?

If none of the above, how would you use the existing 1/2 copper line and transition to PEX? Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 12-30-18, 06:27 PM
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I probably wouldn't bother with a manifold. It's sometimes useful, but in just a small area of your house, in my opinion, it isn't worth the extra cost.

Since you have 1/2" pipe coming in, I would just transition to PEX and stick with 1/2" and use valves at each fixture. No need to make it more complicated than needed.

If you really want to use a manifold, you can certainly just use 1/2" pipe and a 3/4" manifold. It won't hurt anything, nor really help anything either.
 
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Old 12-31-18, 05:46 AM
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I wouldn’t switch from copper to PEX unless I had untreated acidic well water.
 
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Old 12-31-18, 05:53 AM
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Like Zorfdt I wouldn't bother with a manifold. Just run your line and T off as needed. If you think you might upgrade the plumbing in your house I would run a 3/4" trunk line and T off with 1/2" to each fixture. If you don't think you'll be upgrading the rest of the piping in your home then I'd just run 1/2" PEX and T off at each fixture with 1/2"
 
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Old 12-31-18, 06:08 AM
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If you don't think you'll be upgrading the rest of the piping
Why is PEX an upgrade? Isn't it just cheaper and easier to install?
 
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Old 12-31-18, 02:23 PM
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Why is PEX an upgrade?
Nah, didn't really mean it like that. Meant it as if the OP was going to upgrade the other run to 3/4", then it might change some details.

I personally see PEX and Copper about equivalent in most situations, though all my new installs are typically with PEX. I realize others favor Copper for various reasons (but that's a whole other thread)
 
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Old 12-31-18, 02:41 PM
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Even though PEX is less expensive than copper I consider it an upgrade. It is highly resistant to damage from freezing. It's not damaged by corrosive water (in parts of my county copper only lasts 10 years before being corroded through). Very long runs can be made in PEX without any joints (fewer joints = fewer potential leak points). And, it's available in colors so it's easy to keep track of what's the hot and what's the cold. That said I'm a metals person so I really miss the appearance of new, shiny copper though the brass fittings of PEX are some consolation.
 
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Old 12-31-18, 03:13 PM
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Thanks all for the input!
 
 

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