Is clothes washer valve replacement as simple as it looks?


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Old 11-12-22, 11:00 AM
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Is clothes washer valve replacement as simple as it looks?

This is one of the plumbing repairs I am doing at the end of this month. These are the original clothes washing machine shut-off valves from 1995. And the other photo is the replacement valves.

1. Is this as simple as putting a wrench on that nut at the bottom and unscrewing the old valve?

2. Do I put teflon tape on the threads of the replacement valve?

3. What do I do with the plastic fitting on the new valve?




 
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Old 11-12-22, 11:06 AM
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So why replacing, do they leak, do they work?
 
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Old 11-12-22, 11:13 AM
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I can almost guarantee you those gate valves are clogged up with mineral deposits. It happens every time out here because of the hard water. I don't know if they work or not. And I might be selling the house in a couple years.
 
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Old 11-12-22, 01:57 PM
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That valve in the bag is not the correct replacement. That valve requires opening the wall.
Your valves are of the compression type.
An easy replacement if you can find a valve that re-uses the same nut as what you have on there.
The old nut and compression sleeve are on there semi permanently.

 
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Old 11-12-22, 02:31 PM
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First you must have shutoff valves behind these washer valves that must be closed before proceeding to replace washer valves. The replacement valve shown in the second photo does not appear to be correct as the thread that would engage the nut on the water supply is straight thread versus what looks like pipe thread. Pipe thread would eliminate need for the plastic nut.
 
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Old 11-12-22, 03:20 PM
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So back to my original question, have you even tried to turn them on/off?
 
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Old 11-12-22, 07:38 PM
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Man !......I see what you guys are saying. I totally bought the wrong valves. So my original washing machine valves are compression type with the ferrule. Ok. I'll take those back to get refunded.

No. I have never once cycled those washing machine valves. Would you guys keep a 27 year old gate valve even it is working ok? Out here gate valves are well known for clogging from hard water mineral deposits.

I don't mind testing those washing machine valves. I don't think right now is a good time. My house shut-off gate valve outside definitely will not fully close and that is one of the other repairs I have to do.

Maybe I should take pause on this and see if I can find a couple online tutorials to watch.
 
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Old 11-13-22, 04:18 AM
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Would you guys keep a 27 year old gate valve even it is working ok?
That's all I was asking, if the valve functions why replace? It's only going to take a minute to know for sure!
 
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Old 11-13-22, 11:45 AM
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Ok. I'll test the washing machine valves later this month.

I'm curious about something. Am I understanding correctly, that there are additional shut-off valves behind the washing machine shut-off valves behind that wall box? Why do they do that? I mean, how many shut-off valves does one need?
 
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Old 11-13-22, 12:05 PM
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Just the one at the box. I suppose it's possible there is a valve in the line in the basement but I have never seen one on a washer line!
 
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Old 11-13-22, 03:01 PM
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I don't have a basement. I'm confused. One person was saying there is another shut-off valve behind the red and blue washing machine valves in the photo.

Doesn't it go like this? I just have the red/blue washing machine valves in the photo.......along with the outdoor house shut-off valve near the hose bib.........and the city shut-off valve in the front yard near the street?
 
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Old 11-13-22, 03:53 PM
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If you don't have a secondary shutoff valve behind a sink faucet, shower faucet, washing machine faucet, etc., each time there is a faucet problem, one has to turn off water to whole house to allow access to the valve. It may not be an inconvenience for you, but sure is for others. Haven't you noticed plumbing problems occur mostly at night and weekends when stores with plumbing parts are closed (also called Murphy's Law).
 
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Old 11-13-22, 05:22 PM
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Yes.... shut off valves for a sink are nice to have.
Shut off valves for a shower valve or washing machine valves are extremely rare.

If you don't shut the washing machine valves off every time after doing laundry..... leave them alone.
If you want to check them.... loose the packing nut slightly and test them.

Those supply lines need to be routinely changed.
I believe the recommended time is five years life expectancy.
 
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Old 11-13-22, 10:17 PM
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All I was asking is if the red/blue washing machine valves in my photo was the ONLY shut-off valves for the washing machine. Now I understand that it is. Thanks.

It sounded like someone was saying the washing machine shut-off valves could have their own dedicated shut-off valve which doesn't make sense.
 
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Old 11-14-22, 12:37 AM
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It sounded like someone was saying the washing machine shut-off valves could have their own dedicated shut-off valve which doesn't make sense.
But it's possible, there is nothing that says that every sink, the dishwasher, every toilet, every shower, every outdoor spigot has it's own isolation valve but sometimes they do, you just have to search for them. Having a house with a basement makes it very simple, if you have a slab maybe less so but they would be someplace accessible!
 
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Old 11-14-22, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
"It sounded like someone was saying the washing machine shut-off valves could have their own dedicated shut-off valve which doesn't make sense."

I agree , having to shut the water off to whole house because there was no dedicated secondary shutoff (isolation) valve isn't a issue, if every plumbing problem could be fixed in 5-10 minutes.
 
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Old 11-14-22, 10:27 PM
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Well, now that you all mentioned this I took an inventory of everything in my small house that has it's own shut-off valve.

all kitchen and bathroom sinks.........yes
both toilets........yes
clothes washing machine........yes
utility sink in garage.......yes
dish washing machine.............yes (shares dual outlet 1/4 turn valve with kitchen faucet)
electric hot water heater tank..........yes
both shower/bath...........NO


Then I have house shut-off valve outside next to hose bib.
And finally.......municipal/city shut-off valve in front yard close to street.

(I have never had a stainless steel braided supply line leak. But I still replace those in about 7 years)

 
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Old 02-06-23, 08:23 AM
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There is no urgent need to do this now. I had to put everything on hold because I broke my finger late last year. Making sure it's fully healed because I need to play catch-up with repairs and chores later this month.
 
 

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