Drain pipe under sink is leaking


  #1  
Old 08-10-23, 06:24 PM
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Drain pipe under sink is leaking

The horizontal copper? drain pipe between the trap and wall is dripping.

I can't really see a hole but I guess it's rotting away? The house is 60 years old so that might be the original pipe? I know it's at least 35 years old when we bought the house.

The pipe is soldered into the wall vertical pipe.

That area of the cabinet / wall is open, so I have less chance of burning the house down trying to remove the pipe at the joint.with a torch, but...

And trying to solder a replacement pipe, I envision making a leaky joint. - I haven't soldered in years.

Any advice on another way to deal with this?

Or get the torch, heat the connection of the vertical and horizontal pipe, pull out the horizontal pipe, clean the y / T connection and put in another metal pipe with flux and solder?

What about cut the pipe near the Y and use a rubber coupling (and plastic horizontal pipe)? But the leak IS near the Y....

This is taken horizontally, you can see the drip:


This is looking up at the underside of the pipe. It's leaking near that yellow line near the solder joint.

 

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08-15-23, 10:33 AM
Pilot Dane
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I'd use a standard Fernco rubber boot, the type without the stainless steel shield. I would cut the pipe and slide the coupling on centered over where you think the leak is. They are easier to work with and your application doesn't need the shield.

The reason for using a plain rubber boot is that the interior is smooth so you can slide it completely onto the pipe. Plus the coupling is more flexible and forgiving which can make it easier to install. A bit of soapy water or child's bubble soap makes it slide easy. You only need a gap big enough to rotate a section of pipe out of the way to install it. Some shielded couplings have a ridge in the center so you can only slide it half way onto the pipe. That means you have to completely remove one end to install the coupling. So, if you get a shielded one make sure it doesn't have the ridge in the middle.
 
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Old 08-15-23, 09:09 AM
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I would try your third option - cut the copper and use a shielded no-hub coupling (the kind with the metal band around the whole thing, not just hose clamps at the ends.) Just make sure you get one that says it is copper-to-plastic.

not sure what size your pipe is, but here's a link to a 1.5" version:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Fernco-P...-150/100372289

 
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Old 08-15-23, 10:33 AM
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I'd use a standard Fernco rubber boot, the type without the stainless steel shield. I would cut the pipe and slide the coupling on centered over where you think the leak is. They are easier to work with and your application doesn't need the shield.

The reason for using a plain rubber boot is that the interior is smooth so you can slide it completely onto the pipe. Plus the coupling is more flexible and forgiving which can make it easier to install. A bit of soapy water or child's bubble soap makes it slide easy. You only need a gap big enough to rotate a section of pipe out of the way to install it. Some shielded couplings have a ridge in the center so you can only slide it half way onto the pipe. That means you have to completely remove one end to install the coupling. So, if you get a shielded one make sure it doesn't have the ridge in the middle.
 
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Old 08-16-23, 08:01 AM
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I will always defer to Pilot Dane's advice - he knows way more than I do and his logic is sound!
 
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Old 08-16-23, 08:30 AM
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First thing, you really need to know where the leak is located to figure the correct fix. If it's the joint then you have solutions, but could it be above the joint and just running down?

Remember, water take the route of least resistance which may be that horizontal pipe.
 
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