How to remove these old rings?


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Old 10-08-23, 11:59 PM
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How to remove these old rings?


Is there just an older tool not worth investing in and just chucking the fittings or is there another way to get these off?
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Old 10-09-23, 06:14 AM
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There is a ring removal tool but it is designed to salvage/reuse the fitting. First you must cut the pipe/tubing. Then you insert the tool in from the cut end and it splits the copper ring.

You can do it manually by working carefully with a hack saw or Dremel tool. Make sure to not cut through the plastic tubing. If you nick the sealing rings of the fitting underneath it is scrap.
 
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Old 10-09-23, 07:28 AM
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Pilot Dane are you talking about that cone tool that you insert and it opens it from inside I've seen? Either way, so it's a matter of how much I cash save in these fittings vs the cost of the tool ml what about the rings? can you reuse them too? But then you'd need a whole other tool to crimp those right? I'm thinking about getting the crimp tool for PEX but if it won't crimp the old rings I'll probably just want to get the new stuff and just chuck the old right? Or maybe the old tools I could find cheap enough and reuse the old fittings and rings with newer PEX pipe?
 
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Old 10-09-23, 11:29 AM
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No, the is more like a pair of single sided wire cutters. You insert the rounded part of the jaw into the fitting. Then the sharpened wire cutter side comes down on the outside cutting the ring. Then you give the fitting a quarter turn and do a medium squeeze on the tool which makes the copper ring butterfly open.



Copper crimp rings are single use only because they are squeezed so hard during installation that they change size. You must destroy the copper ring to remove it so it's scrap after removal.

I don't know what you mean by the new stuff. There are three basic methods to attach PEC tubing to a fitting. The fittings can be reused but any compression rings on the outside are single use only and must be replaced with each use.
 
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Old 10-10-23, 08:34 AM
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Pilot Dane what about these pliers? Are they not sufficient? Or should I invest in these other ratcheting ones for another $8 more or $30 more for one handed ones?
 
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Old 10-10-23, 09:51 AM
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Your photo is a totally different tool. The tool to remove crimped copper rings is very specific. Not terribly expensive, but it's specific to removing crimped rings and isn't used for anything else. So, either buy the correct tool or work carefully with a hack saw or Dremel tool to cut the ring off.
 
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Old 10-10-23, 10:14 AM
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Pilot Dane oh sorry, I totally changed the subject. I'm asking about crimping. There is this simple two piece tool for cheap or various more complicated crimp tools up to $45 for a ratcheting one handed one.ia this cheap one sufficient enough or so you run nay risk of either not crimping tight enough or too tight? I think I can handle it with this simple crimp tool but just wanna double check with others
 
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Old 10-10-23, 11:49 AM
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You are talking about two different tools; a crimper and a pincer. They use different rings on the pipe and are not interchangeable. You need to match the correct tool with the rings you are using. Copper rings need a crimping tool that squeezes the ring down to the proper size. The stainless steel clamp bands need a pincer tool.
 
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Old 10-10-23, 12:15 PM
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Pilot Dane So the one I posted above works with ss pex clamps? It's the cheapest one and I don't want to spend more than I need to, and I prefer simple tools like ones needing calibration for the perfect I guess it's the end result thickness of the crimped ss clamp ring. This $8 tool with a steady hand and measured strenth looks to be sufficient for the job. Am I wrong?

I'm not talking about the tool anymore for taking off the copper rings
 
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Old 10-10-23, 12:24 PM
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Old 10-13-23, 08:03 PM
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If your careful and have a steady hand , use a hacksaw
looks like brass
.
i use a hacksaw all the time in cutting off pex rings
 
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Old 10-13-23, 09:34 PM
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Lokin4AReason thanks. I decided on getting the tool since prolly end up doing my whole system eventually, which was put together with these.

Any opinion on these rings vs the stainless steal ones you pinch the little collars on? I got the tool for those plus those rings figuring they were at least most popular but other than that idk why they'd be better.
 
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Old 10-14-23, 06:42 AM
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Both types of rings are approved. The copper rings are less expensive but require the correct size crimper die for each size. The stainless rings are more expensive but you can crimp multiple sizes using the same tool. If you've already got the tool for the stainless rings I'd stick with them.

Before reusing your old brass fittings give them a good inspection. Some water chemistries can erode them from the inside causing them to fail. In most waters though they can last almost forever.
 
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Old 10-14-23, 12:20 PM
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Pilot Dane cool, thanks
 
 

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