Removing lock without calling a locksmith

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  #1  
Old 08-02-16, 02:36 PM
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Removing lock without calling a locksmith

So we have this door that won't open. Even the previous owners didn't have it fixed. Makes no sense to me because it connects to the patio.



It has the exact same lock on the other side. Have no idea how to remove it and I'm thinking the screens are on the part of the door that's not visible because it won't open.

Help?
 
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Old 08-02-16, 02:46 PM
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Not sure I understand your question. Do you have the key for this lock? Are you trying to open the lock or take it out of the door?
 
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Old 08-02-16, 03:08 PM
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Unfortunately no key. Previous owners didn't have it either. So we are trying to remove it and install a new lock.

Even opening it would be awesome
 
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Old 08-02-16, 03:22 PM
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What does the other side look like?
 
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Old 08-02-16, 04:00 PM
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Actually it's identical. The other side has the same lock
 
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Old 08-02-16, 04:25 PM
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Until the locksmiths come in, any clue of how to remove the lock will be inside the house. Deadlocks are designed to be mounted from inside the house to prevent access to the screws from outside.
Look for any screws on the inside part of the lock or look for a cover that may be hiding the screws.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 04:28 PM
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Ok I'll do tht when I'm off in a few. I'll update with my findings
 
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Old 08-03-16, 06:14 AM
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More in depth photo of lock. I see a slot, maybe inserting something in here will remove the lock?
 
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Old 08-03-16, 06:45 AM
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As Brian said there is likely a cover that comes off to reveal the screws. Gently pry on the interior side of the lock, the cover is fairly thin so be sure to pry on the cover and not the lock itself.
 
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Old 08-03-16, 08:08 AM
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Well apparently this may require a locksmiths touch. The cover won't budge which prevents me from removing the lock
 
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Old 08-03-16, 09:30 AM
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Based on how that lock looks I would insert a flat screw driver and pry it off. Your don't really care about damaging the lock as it needs to be replaced anyway.
 
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Old 08-03-16, 11:29 AM
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I'll take a few more whacks at it this evening
 
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Old 08-03-16, 01:37 PM
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I am 90% certain that those lock cylinders screw into a piece that is mortised into the door. They each have a long locking screw or two that screws in from the edge of the door so removing the cylinder(s) with the door closed is next to impossible.

You MIGHT be able to drill out the keyway and open the lock if the parts are not hardened steel.
 
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Old 08-03-16, 06:57 PM
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Looks like an Adams-Rite hook bolt, usually found on commercial/retail glass/aluminum doors. Door has to be open so you can remove edge plate, then loosen set screws so cylinders can be unscrewed. A locksmith would first try to pick the lock open, and, failing that (it looks like a Lockwood keyway, not always easy to pick) he might try impressioning a key, (a process that could take a half hour to an hour, if it's stubborn). But because time is money, and a replacement cylinder is dirt cheap, he will probably just "remove" the cylinder and replace both as a keyed-alike pair.

This type lock, as configured in your photo, is very, very common on commercial doors, and they are subject to a serious vulnerability unless a certain inexpensive accessory piece is used, (but rarely is, your door being no exception.) Because of this, I hesitate to describe it here, and in any event, would result in you're having to replace the cylinders and a broken internal lock piece anyway. A locksmith knows to replace the outer cylinder with this accessory to prevent the vulnerability referred to.

Incidentally, most building and fire codes preclude using a key cylinder on the inside, for life safety reasons. Your inside key cylinder can easily be replaced with a "thumb-turn" cylinder that fits into the same hole. If this is on an outside structure, the codes might not apply, but they usually do on perimeter doors of a habitation.
 
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Old 08-03-16, 07:12 PM
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Furd is essentially correct in his description, except the set screws are very short, 3/16" to 5/16" depending on backset. Drilling the plug out is a brute-force method, no secrete to that. Not quite as easy as it sounds, because even though drilling brass, the drill will continually "hang" and jerk as you encounter each pin tumbler. You'll make a hell of a mess, and may damage the lock, in addition to the cylinder, and even the door, if you use a powerful drill. And even with the cylinder drilled out completely, the mess left in the lock may make it very difficult to operate the bolt.
 
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Old 08-04-16, 03:38 AM
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No idea about lock but since you have access to both sides of door can't you pop the pins out of the hinges and take door off. Than you could get to the screws.
 
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Old 08-07-16, 07:28 AM
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Haven't heard back from OP....I guess a "few more whacks" did it.
 
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Old 08-19-16, 05:37 PM
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You can use vise grips or channel locks to grip one cylinder and turn it counter clockwise, effectively breaking the retainer screw. The remove the cylinder and simply flick the lock mechanism to open the door.
 
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