Door Jamb Broken

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  #1  
Old 01-10-17, 11:26 AM
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Door Jamb Broken

Hi,

I have a closet door with a broken door jamb/ lock strike. The door frame is half wood and half metal. You can't tell from the pictures below, but the door frame is actually backwards, and previous owners made a makeshift hole for the door lock. It worked for a while, but recently, the wood broke, not allowing the door to stay in the locked position. It can now be simply pushed open.

Not really sure how to fix this, and open to all suggestions. Initally thought to use some wood filler, or possibly screw on a simple metal strike plate.

I will be selling the apartment shortly, but would like to have this fixed prior. Any help is appreciated.

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Old 01-10-17, 11:33 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

Short answer is you will need to cut out a section of the wood which includes the damaged area and replace it.
 
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Old 01-10-17, 11:33 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'd cut out the damage and install a dutchman, basically adding new wood to replace what you cut out.
Wood filler with screws long enough to attach the strike plate to the stud will work for awhile.
 
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Old 01-10-17, 11:40 AM
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Thanks for the ideas. I don't have any tools, so it might be difficult for me to do myself.
 
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Old 01-10-17, 11:45 AM
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Might be a good time to start your tool collection
A multi-tool like Fein's multimaster would work good for this project .... I have the cheap harbor freight version and it works great in a non professional setting.
 
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Old 01-10-17, 12:00 PM
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Your call but as DIY projects go, this one is pretty basic.
 
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Old 01-10-17, 12:39 PM
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Thanks for all the feedback.
 
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Old 01-10-17, 12:57 PM
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It looks like the vast majority of the damage is on the casing. (See the line running up and down?) If you don't mind the casing not matching other doors in the house, I would pop off the casing on all 3 sides of the door and replace it. Then just plug the holes in the jamb and use wood filler on anything behind the casing that needs to be filled. And maybe get a new "t-strike" plate.


If that's too much work since you are selling it, I would just bondo it up, (will take at least 2 coats and some since and in or carving) and put the t-strike on.
 
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Old 01-13-17, 05:31 PM
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We've recently had a number of inquiries along these same lines...as usual, the fix depends on how much you're willing to spend vs. how much labor you want to tolerate... a good compromise might be to get a commercial strike plate (ANSI 4-7/8") and surface-mount it (your photo shows sufficient clearance) over the old prep. Your local locksmith should have several used ones on hand he might give you, or sell you a new or like new one for $5 or less. However, due to the narrowness of your frame, the screw holes might be too close to the trim to hold well, so you might need to drill new holes closer to the door stop. If you'd like less labor for more cost, Don Jo Manufacturing (online or thru your smithy) has some strike plates with different hole patterns. There's a 4-7/8" plate avail. with additional hole near the door stop that might work. You'll need to wood putty a little behind the plate after installation to make it look good.
 
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Old 03-08-17, 04:04 PM
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rstripe is on the money here. There are multiple options for long lipped strike plates that will repair that inexpensively. But, in another thread I mentioned about a product called Plast-Aid. It is a terrific repair product for many and varied applications. Costs about $20 and has helped me hundreds of times with unusual stuff that others just dont want or know how to fix
 
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