Help identifying this locking doorknob for tightening purposes


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Old 07-30-17, 08:50 AM
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Help identifying this locking doorknob for tightening purposes

Hello -- I'd like to tighten (not replace, unless I have to) my apartment's front doorknob, which has come loose from regular use. Unfortunately, while I've been able to find instructions for servicing virtually every kind of locking doorknob imaginable, I haven't found anything on ours, where the lock is not in the handle itself.

Anyone have a name or thoughts on how this is tightened? There is no release clip on the handle, so it looks to me like I might need to take everything off. Just want to be sure before I get going.

Thanks for any insight.

In the photos below, the light side is the interior.

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Old 07-30-17, 09:33 AM
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That is an old mortise lock. If you rent the apartment you need to contact the landlord to fix it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqLFSC6-5Wk
 
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Old 07-30-17, 10:18 AM
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As Ray said, it's the owner's job to fix....but if that's like pulling teeth, and you like DIY anyway, consider:

The #1 complaint and weakness on old residential mortise locks is the knobs coming loose. Most designs use a set screw in the throat (shank) of the inside knob and I see from your photo you have this design. When loose, the inside knob will unscrew from the threaded square spindle, which allows the outside knob to pull off. The spindle is usually riveted into the outside knob. If the threads are not stripped (possible if it's really worn out) simply loosen the set screw (2 or 2-1/2 turns) and screw the inner knob (CW) on some more. Remember the knob must be set at the 12, 3, 6, or 9 o'clock set screw position so that tightening the screw will engage one of the flats of the square spindle. This screw, must be really tight.
 
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Old 07-30-17, 10:30 AM
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Your photo also shows the outer knob suffering a bit of "dropsy" as if someone has pounded on it and bent the throat. This may prevent it from nesting into the bearing on the escutcheon without binding. The outer knob and spindle assy. should be removed, and with the spindle placed in a vise, the knob can be bent back straight. Before reassembly, unscrew the inner spindle from the outer and grease the threaded connecting stud, screw back together all the way, then back off 1/2 turn, then re-insert into lock. A bit of grease on the inner and outer bearing surfaces wouldn't hurt, as well.
 
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Old 07-30-17, 03:11 PM
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Thanks folks -- will give this a careful look.

We own this place, so it's on us (or a trained professional)...
 
 

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