Which screw for hasp lock?

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Old 12-28-18, 03:48 AM
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Which screw for hasp lock?

I'm securing a shed door with a hasp lock but it comes with half inch screws!
what would be more secure?
The door is metal on outside, wood interior, metal back. The door frame is wood with a stud behind.
Can I just use 3.5" screws into the stud?
What about the metal - bolts to the inside?
The hasp bolts are hidden when closed...
 
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Old 12-28-18, 03:57 AM
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If the screws are hidden from the outside then you have as much security as possible from a door lock. If somebody wants to rip it open they will. But I think I like the idea of a bolt that goes through the whole door. Makes it much harder to rip off.
 
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Old 12-28-18, 04:01 AM
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What level of security do you need? Is this a backyard shed or like a machine shed or something on a farm?
 
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Old 12-28-18, 04:08 AM
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Shed on side of house. Sometimes some items that are more expensive but nothing major.
The screws would easily be ripped out with a crowbar currently.
 
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Old 12-28-18, 04:19 AM
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Go with the more secure bolts. You might even want to put an alarm on it. But that depends on you neighborhood.
 
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Old 12-28-18, 04:25 AM
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Can't do the bolts into wood though? At least it wouldn't be easy to put something on the inside of the wood frame. Is a long screw the only option? Screws are pretty brittle
 
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Old 12-28-18, 04:30 AM
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On all outdoor gate hardware and doors I use the longest screws I can get away with. I generally use the longer screws just to prevent them from loosening over time on their own. As Norm said, most likely if someone uses a crowbar, they will split the door frame if it is just wood. As it's a garden shed, and I'm assuming you are protecting against a crime of opportunity, I would just use the longer screws and not bother with bolts.

We have an internally reinforced steel quonset hut "shed" at our remote cottage that houses all the motors, generators, boats and valuables we leave there. It's built to withstand a prolonged intrusion effort with angle grinders and chainsaws. We leave the cottage unlocked.
 
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Old 12-28-18, 04:37 AM
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Why can't you put bolts through wood?

I normally use 1/4" or 5/16" bolts and through bolt. I insert the bolt from the outside. Then on the inside I use a fender (large diameter) washer and nylok nut. Even if someone turns the bolt on the outside the nylok nut is very resistant to coming loose without a wrench to stop it from turning.

If you must use a screw most home centers and hardware stores carry structural screws. They are more expensive than deck screws but are often sold individually. Their steel is much higher quality and they are available in a variety of sizes and lengths.

 
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Old 12-28-18, 10:40 PM
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I'd use carriage bolts, as many times a few of the holes in the hasp are square, to accept the heads of these bolts. If not square, no worries, they can't be accessed under the hasp anyway. Note that the hasps are usually the weak link, because people will tend to buy a garden variety cheap hasp then put some gargantuan padlock on it. High security hasps are not as easy to get at big box stores as padlocks are. And since shed doors tend to sag a lot, causing hasps to become hard to operate, a heavy chain and padlock works pretty good too.
 
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Old 12-29-18, 03:44 AM
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Hasps are used in a variety of applications and the manufacturer obviously has no way to know who will buy which one for which application so they include only one means to fasten them. So it's very common to want or need to use something other than the screws that are included. The only criteria is that you need something that matches the size of the mounting holes and you want something with a flat head in order for the hasp to lay flat on itself. You can use longer flat head wood screws or you can use flat head machine screws, and either of those will be readily available at the same place you got the hasp.
 
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