CIFIAL lever handle door latch

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Old 03-18-19, 05:51 PM
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CIFIAL lever handle door latch

I have Cifial lever handle door latches in my home. In one of them the square rod that goes through the center came unscrewed at the center. When I tighten it enough to stay tight and actuat the door latch, one of the handles points down at about 45 degrees. This is because to get it tight enough to stay firm, the two halves of the square rod are not square with each other. I am afraid to try to tighten it further as it will probably break the screw connection before the two halves become square. But in order for the door handles to both be parallel to the floor, the two halves must line up square. Any suggestions as to how to solve this problem?
 
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Old 03-18-19, 06:02 PM
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Take it apart, put a generous amount of blue loctite threadlocker on the square rod threads and get it reasonably tight... and aligned the way you want. Let it set up before you put it back together and put any pressure on it. Sets in approximately 10 minutes, Full cure in 24 hrs.

If needed, you can put a very thin plastic washer between the two halves as a spacer, then cut or grind off the excess.
 
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Old 03-19-19, 07:07 PM
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I am not familiar with this brand, but what you describe may be a "Swivel-Spindle" that is, it may be designed to swivel in the middle. Question: On a known correctly-operating passage latch (no locking button), when you depress one lever, does the other one go down too? If it does NOT, you probably have a Swivel-Spindle. On a locking model, such as a Privacy set (bathroom), after you lock it with the button, can you then unlock it by operating the inside lever? If so, you likely have a Swivel-Spindle.

Take a good lock off another door and reassemble it in your hand. The 2 spindle halves should be 1/2 or 3/4 turn LOOSE from the point at which they become snug....allowing them to swivel freely. The swivel location should be exactly centered in the latch tube. The tube probably has 2 separate spindle cams, such that each cam will retract the latch independently. That way, operating either lever will retract the latch, without the other lever having to operate as well.

If the little threaded stud, that the 2 spindle halves screw into is not well lubricated, it will wear out prematurely, and begin to strip. Then one of the levers will come off in your hand one day.

I could be totally wrong here, again, not familiar with the brand, so just a guess.
 
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Old 03-20-19, 05:02 AM
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Thank you for this information. There does appear to be two sides to the cam. I have to find some way to center the spindle to make it work as you describe. It is difficult to hold the spindle in place and put on the handle. The spindle can be too far into esther handle and then the system won't work. In the end, you have to tap the handle pretty hard to make it set into place, and this tends to move the spindle. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 03-20-19, 04:35 PM
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I would remove the lock from another door, carefully noting how it works, in relation to the bad one. Usually this type of arrangement has some way to compensate for different door thicknesses, and the only way I know of is that the square hole in the outer lever, where the spindle goes into, usually has a spring at the bottom of the hole, such that when the lock is assembled, puts continual pressure on the spindle. Near the end of the outer spindle, where it screws onto the threaded stud (that joins the inside spindle), should be a shoulder (or a pin, is sometimes used) which limits the distance the spring can push the spindle assembly into the latch tube, so that even with different door thicknesses, the spindle assembly will always align and center correctly in the latch tube. Again, look at a good lock and compare.
 
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