How to adjust door lock


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Old 09-16-22, 02:23 PM
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How to adjust door lock

Hello,
We have a slam door lock which under normal operation, when we depress the latch and turn the key clockwise, the latch stays depressed. Lately, the latch is not staying depressed when we perform the above. Is there an adjustment to be made that will restore this functionality?

I have attached photos of the outside, inside and latch of the lock.
Thank you.



 
  #2  
Old 09-17-22, 05:33 AM
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You have an Adams-Rite 4500/4700 series deadlatch. The first picture below shows a bare baody of the lock. The second picture is an enlargement showing the the piece (tinted red) that actually holds the latch back (it is part of the body and not available separately). There is another piece on the other side plate.

What often happens is that we forget the exact instructions for using the holdback. Here is my version.
  1. Depress the latchbolt all the way and hold it there.
  2. Turn the key as far as it will go (in your case, clockwise) and then try to turn it a little further. You may feel a snap indicating everything is in its proper position (I've been retired for some time).

If that doesn't solve the issue, the lock will need to be replaced. With all the possible variations, you might want to have a locksmith do that.



Good luck and let us know what does or doesn't work.
 
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  #3  
Old 09-17-22, 04:05 PM
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ThisOldMan provided a very good illustration of the part in question. Several things can happen:
1. With daily use, it can eventually break off. It is not a replaceable part. Replace lock.
2. It can become harder and harder to engage over time, in which case a dab of grease will fix.
3. It can become loose and floppy, and therefore not say in place when actuated. Replace lock.
4. With daily use, it can wear a burr into the brass cylinder cam. Cam is replaceable.

The newer versions of these (part number is 4900 IIRC) are better made, especially the hold-open dog.
And I'm sure you're already aware, these locks don't offer much in the way of security, despite the ugly latch guard. The original deadbolt offered 10 times the security, but operationally, lots of business owners like to lock the door to the public at a certain hour, then allow employees to leave later and have the door latch automatically.
 
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Old 09-17-22, 05:02 PM
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@ThisOldMan......OP uses an interesting term, "Slam" lock. While we all know what this means, it's a term I've never in 45 yrs in the trade, heard of, either from laymen or within the trade. This may be a regional thing, as my British brother-in-law says it's used in the UK, for sure. It may be used in the New England states (esp. NYC) as well, where the Segal type jimmy-proof rim locks are so popular. In fact, Segal is still selling a self-latching vertical bolt rim lock they call a "Slam Lock", which was patented by Sam Segal back in the 30's I think. Lo, how the mighty have fallen, Segal is now owned by Prime Line.
 
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Old 09-18-22, 09:19 AM
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I agree that terminology can be all over the place and varies by region. I know that terms I learned over 50 years ago are no longer used. Kudos to ALOA for trying to bring standardization to terminology.

I surprised at the regionalization of brands. I trained in a pretty big city where one then gone brand was a common as grains of sand on a beach. But 200 miles away, it was as hen's teeth.

You're right about Segal, surprising. Made me think of an old nemesis. The Keil Rim Deadbolt with rotating bolts. Fantastic piece of hardware that I always had difficulty picking. Don't know if they came from Keil like that or someone had fiddled with them. I wouldn't be surprised if there aren't still some in use.


 
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Old 09-18-22, 02:12 PM
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Wow, what a great pic. Never seen one here in Texas, tho we did have a Keil manual key machine in our shop for a while. Yeah, Francis Keil got his start in NYC in the 1880's and I'll bet, just like with Segal, there's still a bunch of Keil rim locks surviving back East. Along with Yale, Eagle and Corbin.

Back to OP's photo, notice how the door edge cutout is way wider than the lock, (which of course, replaced the original 1850) and do IRC that that means it's a Kawneer door? Wasn't there a dispute or agreement between A/R and Kawneer that required a larger aluminum faceplate to properly secure the A/R 1850 in Kawneer's wider prep?
 
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Old 09-18-22, 04:48 PM
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Man, I've been gone from straight locksmithing for so long there is a lot of stuff I don't remember. I do remember the wider faceplate. May be a Kawneer door, I don't remember who used that weatherstrip assembly recessed into a channel on the active leaf.
 
 

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