Rain Gutter sloping wrong way due to foundation settling

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Old 05-18-16, 09:18 AM
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Rain Gutter sloping wrong way due to foundation settling

Hi-

I have a traditional spike supported rain gutter.

The rain gutter is 8 feet long and slopes the wrong direction 1/2 inch to 1 inch.

How do I get this slope the right way? Would it be easier to move the spout?

Thanks!

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Old 05-18-16, 09:27 AM
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The gutter has to come down if you want to change the slope. Installing an additional downspout on the other end might be an option.
 
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Old 05-18-16, 09:31 AM
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I guess where I am puzzled is how to bring it down. It has sheet metal screws and it also has spikes.

Any tips on that?
 
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Old 05-18-16, 09:37 AM
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The screws are easy to remove but it can be difficult to remove the long nails without damaging the gutter.
 
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Old 05-18-16, 09:43 AM
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remove the spikes first or last? do the spikes provide the main structural support? could i gut the spikes with metal snippers?
 
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Old 05-18-16, 10:24 AM
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If you have space to do so, which I assume you do since you asked if you could move it, the simplest option would probably be to leave everything as it is and add a downspout at the opposite end. You can buy the downspout adapter and corresponding hole saw at the same local lumberyard or big box where you get the elbows and downspout.
 
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Old 05-18-16, 10:45 AM
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to add a downspout, do you recommend t-ing into the existing spout, or just do a whole separate line?
 
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Old 05-18-16, 11:23 AM
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What I suggested was leaving the existing downspout as is, but adding a second one at the opposite end of the eave trough. You would drill or cut a hole in the bottom of the eave trough, and insert a new puck and downspout. Or you could go the other route and rehang the existing eave trough. Take a block of wood that fits the dimple in the top of the trough, tap it with a hammer, and the spikes should come out far enough that you can grab them with a claw hammer to work them out. What I would do is something like tap them out say Friday night so that you're ready to go, and ask a buddy with another ladder and hammer to stop by Saturday morning, so that you could remove the center spikes, each work toward opposite ends, pull the spikes and rehang it. Better yet since I forgot you said it's only about 8' long, figure where you need each end in order to get the pitch you want, pull the center spikes so that you have some flex, pull the spikes at one end, renail it where you want it, go to the other end and do the same thing, and finish up by reinstalling the center spikes. You may even find that you can do what you need by just dropping or raising one end. Once you're done, since you mentioned foundation settling, make sure that the ground slopes away from the house and that you have sufficient extension for the water to get away from the house.
 
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Old 05-18-16, 12:34 PM
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so are you saying like an 4' 8' foot block of wood to put under that lip on the front of the gutter from the outside front. pound it and it kind of compresses the gutter so that a hammer can get access to the nail heads?
 
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Old 05-18-16, 12:47 PM
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No, nothing that elaborate. Just something like a 1/2" thick 6" block that you can slip behind the flat part along the top of the gutter, set it right next to the spike so that you can tap it out without bending the gutter up with your hammer. Just enough to get the spike away from the face, then you can access the head without deforming anything. If they've been in there long enough it won't take much.
 
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