Where to caulk coil wrapped window trim

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Old 11-08-17, 08:07 AM
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Question Where to caulk coil wrapped window trim

I recently bought a 1938 house whose previous owner put in vinyl replacement windows shortly before the sale. They didn't do a very good job on the caulking and the coil wrap is still missing a lot of nails where they had to pull it off to replace the windows. I'm trying to fix it up before winter, but I'm out of my wheelhouse and don't want to caulk anything that's supposed to be left alone for drainage. The original wood trim (painted green in photo) is caulked to the new window, but it looks like the seam between the green wood trim and the coil wrap was just nailed and has never been caulked. Should it be, or do I just replace the nails and paint the wood? Is the seam between the vertical trim wrap and the wrapped sill supposed to be caulked, or is that just trapping water if the side isn't sealed?

(Sorry, I don't know why my photos are rotated like that.)
 
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Old 11-08-17, 01:38 PM
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You need to caulk the seams between the vertical edges of the siding (shingles) and the vertical coil wrap and the seams where the vertical coil wrap meets the sill. I would also add an aluminum drip edge at the top of the window. This may require trimming one-half inch or so from the shingles at the top of the window to allow the drip edge to be pushed behind the singles. Caulk the bottom of the cut shingles at the drip edge. Nail the vertical coil wrap on whichever side (parallel to window or perpendicular to window) has the wooden framing in contact with the vertical wrap. If parallel to window, try small aluminum screws on the short return against the green framing in the photo to improve appearance.
 
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Old 11-08-17, 09:34 PM
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Having installed replacement windows since 91, I have wrapped a window or two. That's a pretty poor looking job... they just removed the storm window and put in the replacement window, leaving the blind stop completely uncovered. (the holes are from where the former storm window screws went)

IMO caulking is not gaining you anything other than making a holy mess out of it and making it harder to wrap it correctly in the future. My first opinion would be to do nothing... instead save your pennies to have it rewrapped in the future. The cladding does nothing to seal out drafts so IMO caulking before winter is pointless.

I would also recommend that you not cut into your asbestos siding at ALL.

If you had a metal brake and trim coil you could cover the blind stop... Then caulk it where it meets the window on one side and the existing wrap on the other, for appearance sake. But I wouldn't waste my time on that... it needs to be completely reclad.
 
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Old 11-13-17, 05:56 AM
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Thanks beelzebob and XSleeper, that helps. Yeah, I suspect based on some really weird looking bits that the prior owner put in the replacement windows themselves without really knowing what they were doing.

I know I don't want to mess with the asbestos at all, the windows without drip edges are the ones about a foot below a pretty deep soffit so I think they're alright without a drip edge. I want to cover or replace the siding in a couple years anyway, so I'm mostly trying to keep the trim from rotting until then.
 
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