What's the best option...?

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  #1  
Old 05-20-18, 12:36 AM
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Question What's the best option...?

Greetings All,

I have a brother who used to do roofing, so we won't be complete DIYers. Having said that, we need to reroof our cottage. With the knowledge the house will be demo'd in 5 years or less, to be replaced by a brand new Modular home.

We need to figure out what the cheapest method would be for a roof with the following footage etc probably would be. I don't expect an exact quote, more which method "Should" be cheapest and would easily last 5 years.

https://scontent.fsnc1-1.fna.fbcdn.n...4d&oe=5B94FE47

https://scontent.fsnc1-1.fna.fbcdn.n...a5&oe=5B7E273C

I have figured out we need just over 24 Bundles of 3 tab shingles, as the house has 8+ Squares. The rise(pitch?) is 6 inches over 12 inches, so would that be a low or medium pitch?

Any and all suggestions would be gladly appreciated

Cheers,
RhainyC
 

Last edited by RhainyC; 05-20-18 at 12:44 AM. Reason: Trying to get pics to show properly
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  #2  
Old 05-20-18, 03:48 AM
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Since you intend to tear the house down in 5 yrs or less I'd consider just installing rolled roofing over what you have. It' would be quicker and I assume cheaper but remember I'm just a painter so if the roofers say I'm totally in left field ......

Most houses have a 4/12 pitch so a 6/12 while not steep is a little more pitch than average.
 
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Old 05-20-18, 01:05 PM
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Rolled roofing is basically just more flexible shingle material w/o tabs or the tar strip on the back. It can work, but I dunno if I'd want to do a whole house with it. It's more susceptible to wind lifting so you have to nail and tar under the bottom edge unlike shingles, which can lead to leaks unless you go back and seal every head. If you are nailing over old shingles, you'll need longer nails of course. If the existing roof is lifted, broken, and wavy...that will telegraph through and weaken that area of the new stuff.
 
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Old 06-17-18, 12:19 AM
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HEEEEELLLLLLPPPPPPP~!!!~ Please

Oh My...Gosh...I'm now in TEARS...

Please see pictures to understand why...

So NOW...

Brother says we need to sister the trusses (which are NOT real trusses) AND sister in new vertical supports as well as putting new decking on.

Anyone have any other ideas???

Or has this down and dirty, only necessary to work for 3-5 years job, just turned into the MASSIVE Money Outlay that it appears...?









 
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Old 06-17-18, 03:43 AM
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Don't get hung up on there not being real trusses, it's just stick built like many are. Why does he think each rafter needs to be sistered? Is there a lot of give? rot? The vertical supports should have been 2xs instead of 1xs but it's been that way since the house was built. Does your locale require a permit/inspection for a new roof?

Obviously any bad decking would need to be replaced but it might be feasible to just cut out the bad and insert plywood to fill those gaps. A pic of the topside would be nice.
 
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Old 06-17-18, 10:32 AM
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MarkSr,

The replacement of most of the boards will definitely be due to rain rot and a whole lot of give in many areas. The roof had no sort of barrier between the tongue and groove decking, and the shingles. We don't have to get any sort of permit as far as I am aware...and I doubt anyone would even notice we're doing anything with it in our neighborhood, as we are at a deadend street, and our neighbors are seasonal.

It appears that the decking will almost definitely need replacing and trying to get everything to seal up properly, and not lift with the roll on roofing we are putting down will be an issue if the decking isn't all replaced.

I'm heading out there today and will have hubby take pictures of the exterior where the roofing has been removed so far(about a quarter off at the moment).
 
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Old 06-17-18, 11:46 AM
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Ok, I have the exterior pictures now, hopefully between all the pics we can find a way to fix the roof that will work for 3-5 years and not break the wee little piggy bank we have...









 
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Old 06-17-18, 02:44 PM
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I think your brother is missing the big picture. If it is going to be torn down in 5 years or less, just staple down a layer of 7/16 plywood or osb onto the roof, then felt it and shingle it with the cheapest shingles you can find. I would not use rolled roofing, but that is just me. Your main goal is that it doesn't leak for 5 years. Who cares if the roof is wavy, or has soft spots... the new plywood will span that. The purpose of the plywood is to make sure your shingles have something solid to nail to, and that they don't happen to go into the void between planks.
 
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Old 06-17-18, 08:16 PM
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XSleeper,

Yes and no. He is worried about what IS up there supporting the roof assembly, will not hold the weight of even the thinnest of plywood/OSB, felt and either shingles or rollout. That is why the concern.

Apparently the roofing that was on there, 3 layers of shingles without any type of underlayment, is/was literally floating on the tongue and groove slatting that used to be the decking for the roof.

We'll see how it goes, but with the extra costs, we'll only be able to do 1/4 of the roof until the next payday rolls around.
 
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Old 06-18-18, 03:37 AM
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Unless the rafters are rotten I don't see the weight concern especially since it's previously held 3 layers of shingles. It wouldn't cost a lot to sister 2x4s to the 1x4 'props' that add support to the rafters, not sure that's needed though. Is there a lot of deflection with the rafters?

Did your brother state exactly what his concerns are? specific areas?
 

Last edited by marksr; 06-18-18 at 04:06 AM.
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Old 06-18-18, 06:40 AM
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I agree, his logic is flawed. 3 layers of shingles was likely at least 630 lbs per sq, or 6.3 lbs per square ft and you are not in a snowy area. Sheathing and 1 layer of shingles weighs less than what was formerly there and would last 5 years. If there is a rafter or two that is simply gone from rotting, I would understand it but I see nothing unusual in the pics.
 
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Old 06-18-18, 11:53 AM
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MarkSr and XSleeper,

His concern is the fact that the three layers that were there, were literally just floating on the decking because almost all the decking was dryrotted. Also many of the rafter beams appeared to be also dryrotted, and the vertical support 1xs are floating because the nails are pulled away from the beams as well.

MarkSr, we actually can get quite a bit of snow where we are, though not always...so that was a concern as well.

We have I think, decided after much discussion and reading your comments/suggestions, to sister every other truss, reattach the verticals, where possible, go with thin plywood, felt and most likely rolled roofing with the edges glued down to prevent wind lift...unless we catch a really good deal on 3tab shingles.

Will keep you all posted with progress...thank you so much for your suggestions.
 
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Old 06-18-18, 12:43 PM
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Just wanted to add, things rot because of being wet, not because of being dry. The word "dry rot" is really a misnomer.

Nails get rusty, shrink and pull loose due to age, high humidity in unvented or under ventilated attics. Hot dipped galvanized nails are preferred. Old houses are almost exclusively bright steel nails that rust, get loose, and cause floor squeeks and such.
 
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Old 06-18-18, 01:15 PM
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XSleeper,
We live in Wet-ern Washington State...wetness is a definite problem here. Add that the house is almost completely shaded and that adds to the issues.

I do agree "dry rot" is the wrong name for it. I also understand about the nails. I'll be talking with my brother later today/this evening and will ask him to be sure to check the actual state of the beams before adding a sistered beam. I don't want to waste money on unnecessary repairs to the trussing.
 
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