Shingle care before installation part 2

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Old 06-20-18, 07:21 PM
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Shingle care before installation part 2

posted a question about leaving pallets of shingles (Owens Corning Duration) out in the sun before install that's been delayed a few days.

They started doing the install today (Wed). It was supposed to be last friday / Saturday. then they said they could do it all on saturday. when we protested if they didn't finish saturday, would they work sunday and they said no, we pushed them to tues. that turned to Wed.,

They stripped off most of the roof (some is 2 layers). and now they tarped because it's supposed to rain tonight.

This guy is supposedly well recommended.... we just have amazingly bad luck - look up old posts here from me about a bathroom. we had issues with most every installer - tiles, cabinets, shower glass.

And this one - the delivery was last thursday. 2 skylights were delivered, not 4. the flashing kits got crushed from the straps on the truck.

they got the 4 skylights but were the wrong size we find out today.

So check these pictures... shingles as a ramp into the dumpster. Shingles as weights for the tarps.

and others where the bundles are cross stacked on other bundles and not supported so drooping, using them to weigh down tarps over items so they are not laying flat...

Overall - a big deal? Realisitically, cosmetically, you aren't getting that close to see any issues once installed? is a roofing project pretty robust / forgiving for leaks, etc?

My wife's looking to give the foreman $100 tomorrow and just ask to try not to skimp / err on the side of spending a little more time / effort...


but still?! Even with a guy that's supposedly recommended. we've seen what he said were houses he did. they looked good.

are we just expecting too much?

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Old 06-20-18, 08:19 PM
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I know of a good way for you to save $100.

Not to brag, but in my area, I'm considered one of the best of the best... I wash the windows i install, vacuum up after every job, haul away the debris, etc... never a single complaint... and I can't recall the last time anyone gave me a tip, before -or after- a job.

Giving a roofer $100 is just throwing good money after bad. You won't get any more time or effort than they give any other job. But they might treat themselves to something to smoke...

Once the grass has died from getting sunburned by that dark tarp you will want your $100 back.

It will get done... it will look fine... doubt you will have any problems. It's not rocket science.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 06-20-18 at 08:39 PM.
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Old 06-21-18, 07:18 AM
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thanks... I mean this as a strong compliment (inflexion gets lost in typing):

Don't you feel surprised that doing basic nice (expected?) things makes you stand out so much?

It's so easy to get a step up over competition - just do what you'd want someone else to do!

It's nice to read that there ARE people like yourself still out there doing those little things that SHOULD be done : )
 
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Old 06-21-18, 08:43 AM
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When I was less experienced (younger) I used to think that most contractors in town had it put together... meaning they were timely, professional, well thought of by their customers, etc. However having been in the business for almost 30 years now, I now know that most contractors struggle to keep their customers happy, have difficulty with their employees and subcontractors, and that these usually will eventually give them a bad name. Disorganization, lateness, indifference seem to be the norm, and the ONLY reason people put up with it is that they are desperate to even find someone who will return their call.

Contractors are generally so busy that they can get away with a lot of stuff and people just accept it as normal. There are of course exceptions... I do some subcontracting occasionally for a "high end" remodeller... and his reputation is number one. The type of employees he has, the type of subcontractors he uses are all a reflection of the clientele he has and the prices he charges them. Things still go wrong now and then but generally everything is run like a tight ship should be.

I'm not knocking drywallers and roofers, most are VERY skilled at what they do, but they are kind of at the bottom of the construction totem pole... and getting their work done fast is usually their one and only main focus, so don't expect too much of them.

You are right, it doesn't take much to stand out as different nowadays. That sort of thing used to be expected, now it's uncommon.
 
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Old 06-21-18, 12:10 PM
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agree 100%

a shame but so true!

thanks!
 
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