New roof - hotter upstairs - does not make sense....


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Old 08-27-18, 06:27 PM
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New roof - hotter upstairs - does not make sense....

We got all new roofs in our town homes. We went with a reputable roofing consultant who helped spec the roof project and in the process made sure that we get a better roof.

After the project was completed I noticed that the upstairs is hotter. So, did neighbors.

I am a bit stumped. All we did:
- new shingles and underlayment (both supposedly an upgrade). The shingles color is roughly the same, Maybe appear a bit darker as the old eons were dirty.
- increased size of ridge vent
- new skylights (Velux). Again, I have to assume that the newer ones are better than 25 year old.
 
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Old 08-27-18, 06:36 PM
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Why was the ridge vent size increased? Is there sufficient soffit vent to replace the air? Even though the color might be the same, I would think the new ones would be darker since they haven't been faded by sun exposure.
 
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Old 08-27-18, 06:43 PM
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we were told the ridge opening is too small. Don't recall any more specific reason. It was large enough before to see daylight. I have not gone up into the attic since the project.
Hard to answer whether there is sufficient soffit venting to replace the air. I see a lot of (existing) white "registers" on the outside. Also that part has not changed. Is there a situation where a ridge vent cane be too large?
 
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Old 08-27-18, 08:23 PM
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Making the ridge vent larger is pointless if there's not enough soffit vent to make up the air.
 
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Old 08-28-18, 07:51 AM
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Besides some technical issues, high vs low vent area, having a larger ridge vent would just increase the total air flow.

My first thought would be the old "forgot yo cut bacl the underlayment" issue. Happens all too often. That is left as a last step before the ridge vent is installed to avoid a rain issue. Go up there to see if you still see that daylight and possibly see the ridge vent itself.

As for the house feeling hot, that isn't exactly the responsibility of the ventilation. Insulation and air sealing between house and attic is what prevents that attic heat from affecting the house. In most cases it just affects the ac bill because that should be controlling the temp and humidity inside.

Did they replace any sheathing where they attic was exposed to workers maybe disturbing ducts or insulation?

Bud
 
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Old 09-16-18, 01:12 PM
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I finally went up into the attic.
There is daylight visible at the ridge vent area. There is a white mesh underneath, assuming to capture bugs.
Did not notice any ducting or insulation disturbed.
 
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Old 09-16-18, 02:00 PM
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Were skylights added? More sunlight coming In?
 
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Old 09-16-18, 02:49 PM
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skylights replaced, not added. Assuming new ones are better
 
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Old 04-07-19, 10:40 AM
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I took a picture of the new ridge vent. The white material looks pretty dense. I can see light through but I woudl not expect a lot of airflow.

In any case, is this what I am expected to see with a new ridge vent?

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Last edited by PJmax; 12-15-19 at 05:03 PM. Reason: resized picture
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Old 04-07-19, 11:31 AM
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I'm just guessing but I'd say No ! That looks like the underlayment that might be used under shingles. Here is a link with some discussion as to what you would expect to see, or not see.

Bud
 
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Old 04-07-19, 11:53 AM
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We don't know what brand of ridge vent was used, and so it's impossible to say what the white material is. If that is the underlayment, then no. A better picture that is in focus might help.
 
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Old 04-07-19, 12:11 PM
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I believe they uses owens corning. I will see if I can get more specifics if needed
 
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Old 04-07-19, 12:49 PM
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another picture. still not great. It seems that the white material is not continuous (from roof). It seems to be the with of the vent stuck on to little black pins.

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Last edited by PJmax; 12-15-19 at 05:05 PM. Reason: resized picture
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Old 04-07-19, 12:55 PM
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I saw those pin looking points and it looks like it was installed from the inside.

If you pull part of it down, what do you see underneath? And check for any manufacturer names.

Bud
 
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Old 04-07-19, 12:57 PM
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I can't reach the ridge, ladder is not an option I will find out more about mfg.

I wonder if we are looking at this:
https://d12m281ylf13f0.cloudfront.ne...s10/1-27-5.jpg

Just seems very dense....
 
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Old 04-07-19, 02:12 PM
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That's possible, however the width of the cut for the ridge is supposed to be around 3", 1.5" on each side. 4" total would still be ok. Hard to judge from the picture but that cut width looks a lot wider, note the nails very close to the edge.

Can you get some plywood up there so you can use a ladder? Be Safe !!

Bud
 
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Old 04-07-19, 02:37 PM
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the roofing consultant specified the vent ridge to be widened....

I only have a small hatch and lots of truss work int he way. Only way woudl be to climb up...
 
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Old 04-07-19, 02:53 PM
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Sometimes you can install some cross pieces a couple of feet above the attic floor and put a piece of plywood or 2x? across to stand on. I've done that for light storage also.

When they cut that opening wider they probably cut the cover we are seeing as well so just stuck it up there to look like it was where it belongs. It is not. It helps to keep the bugs out and I'm not sure what we are seeing is the original material or just house wrap. House wrap would not work.

Bud
 
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Old 05-12-19, 11:55 AM
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My guess is that ridge vent is choking off your ventilation. Same thing happened to me. They used ones with internal baffles that were so restrictive to prevent rain and bugs that they also restricted the air flow. There are tons of articles and forums of people who have had them that say they don't work. Even mold companies who deal with mold everyday have told me these ridge vents are a huge part of the problem.
 
 

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