Ground water coming through concrete floor

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Old 05-14-19, 09:02 PM
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Ground water coming through concrete floor

I recently painted my basement concrete floor. After patching some holes and cleaning the floor I proceeded to paint it with two coats of Drylok Clear Coat waterproofer meant for floors. I then painted over it using Drylok E1 One Part Epoxy. I checked with Drylok and they said it was okay to use the clear coat first to waterproof and use their One Part Epoxy over it.

Well now a few weeks later after many days of quite a bit of rainy weather I noticed two small puddles on the floor. There was also some lines of yellowish discoloration as if water was trying to come through. A few small spots near the walls also showed some dampness and in a few small areas the paint has peeled up. I'm working with Drylok currently to see how they recommend proceeding.

Does anyone have any recommendations as what might work best to seal this floor so ground water won't penetrate? Any water proofing products that are better then the Drylok? I'm tempted to repaint the problem areas with the clear coat and then go over that with another coat of the E1 again. Not sure if that will help. Thanks
 
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Old 05-14-19, 09:52 PM
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"Waterproofing" products that get painted on the inside are not completely effective at stopping ground water because it is under hydrostatic pressure. I'm afraid you are fighting a losing battle and may be expecting too much from the products you are using.

Drylock's directions state:

Floors that are subjected to hydrostaticpressure (water seeping from underneaththe floor) or are continually damp cannot besatisfactorily painted with any paint orcoating. Moisture on basement floorscaused by water seeping through masonrywalls or through floor-wall joints or cracksmust first be eliminated. Use DRYLOK® FastPlug®, a quick setting hydraulic cement, to fillfloor-wall joints or cracks, and If thebasement floor is subjected to hydrostaticpressure use DRYLOK® Clear Masonry Waterproofer to control water. Then applyE1 per label directions. Use DRYLOK®Masonry Waterproofer to seal masonrywalls. In addition, outside work may berequired to eliminate water infiltration.

Note they say "control"... the mfg knows it's impossible to eliminate water infiltration completely with an interior coating, and they have no control over the quality of the concrete, cracks, your floor prep, the amount of water pressure, plugged gutters... etc.

That's why I say you are fighting a losing battle. Not sure what you tried beforehand, but you would have been wise to have first tried to eliminate the water problem in the first place if there was anything simple you could have tried... gutters, (clean gutters won't overflow) getting that roof runoff away from the house, checking the grade around the house to ensure its sloped properly, investing in professional damp proofing- perimeter drains and sump pumps inside the basement to ensure the water table is kept below the concrete at all times.

Product descriptions would have you believe every word, but the old expression "caveat emptor" always rings true. -let the buyer beware.
 
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Old 05-15-19, 01:31 AM
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Not sure what you tried beforehand
So that brings up the million dollar question, were you having any prior water issues before using any of the paints/epoxy products?
 
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Old 05-15-19, 07:09 AM
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When I originally moved in there was significant water issue in that room. We're talking entire floor wet and significant accumulation 1/2"+. Several years back I had a mason I use look at it and by doing some combination of things you alluded to - gutters, redirecting the downspouts/leaders, doing some sealing work outside, etc was able to make a dramatic difference. The room went from getting real significant amounts of water to basically almost none except on a few occasions and then the amount of water was basically minimal - slight small puddle. Dry 99+% of the time. I was hoping using these "waterproofing" products would be enough to take care of this small occasional water but evidently not. Hydrostatic water pressure is proving too much. Any other suggestions?
 
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Old 05-15-19, 07:26 AM
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I would look into putting a few sump pump pits in.
 
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Old 05-15-19, 04:44 PM
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So Drylok got back to me and claims I did not use enough of the clear coat. The total area of the room was 198 sq ft. According to them I should have used 2 GALLONS per coat which means 4 gallons of their clear coat total. That seems like an absurd amount of paint. As it was I felt I was laying it on pretty thick. Since I've now coated the clear coat with the Epoxy they claim the only way to fix it is to remove it down to the bare floor and start over. How would I even start to remove the paint? ANy other suggestions?
 
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Old 05-15-19, 05:25 PM
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How would I even start to remove the paint?
As noted the paint/epoxy is not the the solution to the water issue so you should go back to the cause and do some additional steps to remove the water so that it doesnt have a chance to enter the basement!

So do you have sump pump?
 
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Old 05-15-19, 05:35 PM
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No I do not have a sump pump. Are we talking breaking the concrete, french drains, sump pumps??
 
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Old 05-16-19, 02:33 AM
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Yep, a lot depends on what you do or do not have under your foundation currently.
 
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Old 05-16-19, 04:29 AM
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Also, if you only have problem with major rain, use a dehumidifier. It's a must in a basement situation.
 
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