Floor arching up, I can step on it and it goes flat but then arches back


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Old 06-03-17, 08:12 PM
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Floor arching up, I can step on it and it goes flat but then arches back

Just put these floors this past winter.
Just noticed the floor arching up, not sure how long this went unnoticed but I know it wasn't done this way since I inspected the entire floor when the job was done.
If I step on it, it'll flatten back out but when I step off it, it'll return to it's arched position.
How could this have happened and is there a solution?
BTW the wall on the right of the picture goes to an outside room that isn't climate controlled but tends to be warmer then outside temperature if that matters.
 
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Old 06-03-17, 09:38 PM
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Is it the whole floor or just the transition strip? If it's just the strip, it needs to be removed and shortened slightly.

It went in in the winter, dry and cool. Whole house shrinks. Now it's summer and warmer and more humid. Whole house expands and causes binding.
 
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Old 06-03-17, 09:49 PM
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I wish it was only the transition - it's the boards too .
Not happening elsewhere in the house though.

Do I just wait until winter?
 
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Old 06-04-17, 12:14 AM
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Well, no expert, but it appears the expansion gap around the perimeter is too small. If this was a contractor, call them back. If it was DIY, you are pretty much on your own and will have to unlock a few rows and trim the outer one. I know they can only be removed from one direction (at least I think so) so it might be minimal or a royal PITA. I don't think there's any way to trim them while installed, just have to see what others say.

I can't tell for sure, but have to assume the base was removed and then reinstalled?

Can't give you any more advice. Have only done 2 rooms before and it was back in the glue together days.
 
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Old 06-04-17, 04:30 AM
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I do not see a expansion gap on right side. Should be 1/4 inch all around room.
 
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Old 06-04-17, 04:40 AM
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Just put these floors this past winter.
What kind of flooring are we looking at? How is it installed?
 
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Old 06-04-17, 06:53 AM
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As far as I know it's laminate snap-together flooring.
I didn't do it, a contractor did, I'll reach out and see if he can do an expansion gap.
Thanks
 
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Old 06-04-17, 03:05 PM
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In addition to the expansion gap at that wall any points between there and the other side that may have been anchored may be preventing the floor from floating. Any pianos on that floor. Just kidding but a dividing wall or threshold into another room that got nailed down could cause the floor to shift entirely in the problem direction.

Bud
 
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Old 06-07-17, 10:21 PM
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I fixed my in-laws house by removing the trim and using an oscillating tool to create the expansion gap. Mark the position of the trim with masking tape you you don't go too far.
 
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Old 06-08-17, 06:34 AM
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Just to make sure I understand correctly, the oscillating tool is basically a saw that can reach in edges?
I take off the quarter round trim and cut the flooring that's butted against the wall so now I have some space for the flooring to expand towards the wall (then put back the quarter round)?
 
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Old 06-08-17, 08:03 AM
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Yes that is what you do. I would get a piece or 174 wood to use as a guide for saw. Put 1/4 against wall saw blade next to it. Oscillating tool is very hard to cut a straight line.
 
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Old 06-08-17, 09:35 AM
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How much space (expansion gap) should there be between the flooring and the wall? In other words, how much do I need to cut off?
 
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Old 06-08-17, 01:30 PM
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Remove the shoe molding and draw a pencil line were the base molding falls on the floor. You will want to cut just slightly on the wall side of that mark say 1/8" from the line. That should leave you with a 3/8" gap for expansion. But for the exact amount, consult the flooring installation instruction for your particular floor. Also note, that you don't want to over cut around doorways as the floor should fit underneath the jambs.

Begs another question, did the installers even remove the base molding before installation?
 
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Old 06-08-17, 09:23 PM
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I took off both the quarter round and the main trim.
The flooring does indeed extend all the way to the wall :-(

The oscillating saw isn't fast enough since I have to do about 9' but I can live with it if I have to, personally I'd prefer a circular saw so I can adjust the depth of the cut as long as it was able to go right to the edge (most don't).

The real problem is this: once I make the necessary cut, the drywall drops so far down, almost touching the flooring, that I won't be able to get the cut portion out from under it.

Is my only option to cut off some of the bottom of the drywall so I can pull the cut piece of artificial wood out from the edge or is there a better way?
 
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Old 06-08-17, 09:35 PM
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A 1/2 inch off the drywall won't hurt as it will be covered with trim. You usually don't need that tho. oscillating saw is slow but circular saw won't cut in close enough.
 
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Old 06-08-17, 09:58 PM
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The beauty of the circulating saw is that not only it's fast but your can adjust the height.
The problem is that it has that 1" edge that prevents you from cutting things close (in this case the wood against the main trim.
I have a nail gun and would rather just replace the trim since the oscillating saw is going to take all morning.
Is there a circular saw that only has a minimal edge , say 1/2"?
 
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Old 06-09-17, 01:31 AM
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Nope, none I've ever seen anyway. All are just at 1" I believe. Maybe one of those one handed versa-saw things, but why spend that much on something you'll likely use just once?

What did the contractor who screwed it up initially say? They may have some sort of trim saw that would do it.

An oscillating saw with a fresh correct blade would do it in a very short time. That flooring isn't very thick. I'd use one of the rounded blades on a line marked as described earlier. Who cares if you go a bit into the subfloor? And that could probably be mostly prevented with a spacer block or board to rest the saw on as you cut.

Once it's cut, you should be able to pry it up and out with a painters tool or a tiny prybar or similar.
 
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Old 06-09-17, 04:07 AM
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I've never used one personally but a toe kick saw will cut fairly close to the wall.
 
 

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