Wondering how to replace this old Laundry/ Utility sink faucet that leaks.

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Old 03-09-18, 05:33 PM
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Wondering how to replace this old Laundry/ Utility sink faucet that leaks.

I don't know much about plumbing, but when I replaced my bathroom faucet and vanity top it had water lines (tubes), but this one has the copper water lines going right up to the faucet. Has anyone even seen this type of setup? How can I replace it with a new faucet?

Do I just get another 3 hole type faucet? Do I have to remove the whole sink in order to get the old one apart? It's kind of a tight squeeze under the vanity in the cellar.
 
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Old 03-09-18, 07:18 PM
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Show us pictures of further down on the pipes. Looks like an old style 8" spread rough in where everything was done manually. Are there hot and cold shut offs? Take pics from further away if you could.
 
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Old 03-09-18, 09:03 PM
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Here's some pics of further down.

There are SHUTOFFS, but they are higher up near the ceiling and also control a small bathroom sink behind this vanity. There are no shutoffs underneath the vanity.

The water pipes come right out of the wall and go straight up into the faucet. Should I have it converted by a plumber so that I can use regular water hoses under the vanity? Is a conversion to a more modern setup something I could do myself? Do I have to weld?

The faucet is old and leaks. You can see the water damage below on the shelf. I'm fixing the entire vanity by the way as a project.

In the bottom picture you can see the pipes coming out of the wall. They go straight up the wall and out to a low ceiling in the basement where there are a hot and cold shutoff.
 
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Old 03-10-18, 10:36 AM
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I would cut the pipes under the sink, add valves and replace faucet. Use shark bite valves and SS flex supply lines.
 
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Old 03-10-18, 09:08 PM
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Is it something I can do myself or should I get a plumber?

Do you just shut the water at the valves above these entry points? Do I have to weld, etc?

Do I cut the pipe before the elbow with a hacksaw?

Will water come pouring out?

You can see I have very little 'plumbing knowledge' lol

Thanks
 
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Old 03-11-18, 08:20 AM
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Brian, What you want to do is not hard. However if you have no experience with plumbing or soldering I suggest you do not DIY. If you have friend to guide you, that would the best way to go.

lets start at the beginning. A picture from farther back would help. What I think you have is a typical bathroom sink located in the basement. Not a laundry tub sink.

You could replace/repair the valve stems on the existing faucet. If you plane on replacing the faucet measure the center distance between the handles. Czizzi thinks it's an 8" spread. I'm not sure that's why I would want you to measure the center distance.

If you replace sink turn the valves off that you say are above the sink if you're sure that will also turn off supply to the sink. If not sure, then turn water for whole house. Then you're going to cut the pipes coming up from under the sink about 1 1/2" to 2" from the bottom of the shelf under the sink. Enough to allow room to install valves. Remove old faucet from sink by unscrewing the nuts under the faucet.

Attach new faucet to sink and secure.

You're going buy this type of valve to attach to the cut copper pipes. This is a Shark bite valve (no soldering required) available at HD or Lowes. They just snap on to the end of the cut pipe. Make sure the ends of the pipe are smooth without burrs
(buy a cheap tube cutter if you don't have one). Then buy two of these to attach to valves and faucet . Remove the nut and furrel from valve and attach the supply line directly to the valve. Hand tighten, then maybe just a 1/8 turn with wrench. Turn on water, check for leaks, and you're done.



 
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