Question about the skinny hose in the toilet tank.


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Old 06-07-18, 04:48 PM
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Question about the skinny hose in the toilet tank.

About the tank that holds the water for a toilet. When you flush the toilet, water shoots out of a tiny hose in the tank, filling it back up. This is a very skinny hose. What is this hose called? I need to go to the hardware store and buy a replacement because the old one is partially clogged up and has never been changed.
 
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Old 06-07-18, 04:54 PM
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You might as well just buy a new fluid master repair kit and change the whole thing.
 
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Old 06-08-18, 03:21 AM
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I agree. I suppose you could go to an auto parts store and buy the right size vacuum line but it makes more sense to replace the fill valve - they aren't expensive or hard to install.
 
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Old 06-08-18, 05:19 AM
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The small hose does not shoot into the tank to fill it up. You insert the end of that tube into the overflow riser in the center of the tank. It's purpose is to fill the bowl after a flush. So, after a flush if you've ever seen water trickling into the bowl, it's the water from the little tube up in the tank.
 
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Old 06-08-18, 11:15 AM
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Jeez...buying parts, replacing valves? For what's described as a clogged hose? (not that I've EVER seen one of those get clogged) Just take it off and stick a piece of wire or coat hanger through it, then rinse it out in the sink. You can check flow by flushing the toilet and holding your hand or a cup over the outlet on the valve.

You may just need to (depending on the valve) pop the top off and flush the valve out if it's accumulated crud inside. At the most, a repair/maintenance kit might be needed. Again...depending on the valve.

True, replacing the fill valve is a simple job, but NOT replacing it is even simpler.
 
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Old 06-08-18, 02:24 PM
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Thanks. I will consider changing the whole thing.
 
 

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