Bathroom sinks draining slowly

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Old 12-16-18, 09:57 PM
J
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Angry Bathroom sinks draining slowly

I have a his and her sink that is back to back with our second bathroom sink. When using the his and her, the water drains slowly and will back up into the second bathroom. Further up the line are two toilets and two tubs which flow past the sinks and they flow fine. I've cleared out the clog or restriction a couple times (once with a drain cleaner, once with boiling water and a plunger) and it will drain fine for a while but a few weeks or a month or so later it starts backing up again. The house was built in '72 and there is no hair going down the pipe from that sink. I've taken off both p traps and haven't seen any obstructions. Can anyone give me any advice as to how I can resolve this issue?
 
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Old 12-16-18, 10:26 PM
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You state that when you clean it out the drain improves so there is a blockage somewhere that is not fully being removed, time to get the snake out !
 
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Old 12-16-18, 10:31 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Your problem is a fairly typical one in older houses..... especially if you have iron pipe. The clog usually occurs right at the fitting in the wall where the trap connects. It needs to be cleaned with a snake with a cutting head. I have iron pipes too and this is the one I use. For an inexpensive snake it works well.

RIDGID-Kwik-Spin-41348


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Old 12-17-18, 06:43 AM
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Once you get a drain snake like PJmax's picture remove the trap so you have easy access to the pipe in the wall. Put an old pan, cookie sheet or towel down to catch any mess that may come out. Extend the snake about 12" and tighten the thumb screw on the end. Insert the snake into the drain pipe while turning the handle. You'll feel it stop hard when it hits the back of the 90 degree fitting in the wall. Keep turning while applying moderate pressure and the snake will eventually make it through the bend. Keep turning the handle and slowly push the snake in. When you can't go any further hold the snake right there, do not pull it out. Loosen the thumb screw and pull out another foot or so of snake and re-tighten the thumb screw. Repeat the process of turning the handle and slowly pushing. If you think you've snagged something keep turning and pull the snake out and be ready for a blob of something to emerge. Repeat several times until you're sure the pipe is clear. Re-assemble the drain pipes and turn on the water for a minute to flush out the pipes and make sure you got the clog.
 
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Old 12-21-18, 02:51 PM
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So I've followed y'all's suggestions and when I put the drain snake in, it just heads straight through to the sink on the opposite side. I cannot get the snake to turn to go down the actual drain. I'm attaching (hopefully) a diagram I drew of the drain pipes as I can see them.

Drain diagram
 
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Old 12-21-18, 03:11 PM
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If your diagram is correct then it was plumbed wrong. The drain to sink 3 should not be inline with sink one and two. It should've been elbowed down from the others. Unless you can get the snake to bend down into the green drain line, you have a problem! Can you get any access to the drain (green line) from another entrance?
 
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Old 12-21-18, 04:52 PM
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Well Iím certainly no plumbing expert to say the least, and this may be a harebrained scheme, but could you:

(1) Remove the trap from sink 3 and carefully push something into the pipe sticking out of the wall (I think that pipe is called the trap arm, at least thatís what Iím thinking of). I mean something round and solid that you could push up to the drain pipe and leave there temporarily Ė but secured somehow.

(2) Then take off the trap at sink 1-2 and then put the snake in the trap arm. Would the object from step (1) force the snake down the drain as the snake is pushed in from the sink 1-2 side? Seems like it might.
 
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Old 12-21-18, 10:10 PM
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Yeah, I'm no plumber myself and only know things from watching this old house, but when I saw this, I knew it looked off. I have no other access to it either without doing a remodel and that's just not in the budget. I was able to just plug up the extra holes and plunge from one of the sinks and that seemed to clear it up for now.
 
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Old 12-21-18, 10:14 PM
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Zoesdad, I'd love to do that, but the main drain is metal. Looks partly steel and partly cast Iron. and one of the pieces of plastic is rust welded to the pipe threads, so I would be able to plug it. Also, my best entrance is from sink two right at a t-fitting, so I don't have a straight, albeit fairly straight, shot to properly maneuver it to go to the drain. And honestly, I can't tell what direction it drains after the sinks join.
 
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