How To Fix This Exit Pipe


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Old 07-25-19, 08:07 AM
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How To Fix This Exit Pipe

My friend has a leaking exit pipe in the bathroom on the main floor of his house built in 1959. It is the exit pipe of the vanity sink. It is leaking where the copper pipe threads into the steal female 90 degree connection (red arrow in picture). He tried unscrewing the pipe but the copper pipe inside the vanity just disintegrated from corrosion. After that copper pipe in the vanity he uses traditional PVC J trap piping that is currently removed.

What would be the best way to fix this. The copper pipe going into the stud wall looks to be a 1.5" pipe. It would be difficult to cut. Not enough room for a rotating pipe cutter but perhaps a hack saw or something.

Let me know if anyone has some ideas or questions. Appreciate the help.

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Last edited by PJmax; 07-25-19 at 06:48 PM. Reason: resized pictures
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Old 07-25-19, 08:32 AM
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I don't understand your photos as they appear to be of two totally separate areas, especially the first picture.

The copper pipe in the wall needs to be replaced. As you said, it's just crumbling apart. The pipe in the wall is probably in no better condition than what was under the vanity. Prepare your friend for more leaks and repairs as the rest of the copper piping buried in the walls may be leaking or soon to leak.
 
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Old 07-25-19, 08:44 AM
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The first picture is from the bedroom behind the bathroom and the second picture is from the inside of vanity itself. The vanity wall has tile on the wall. On the other side there is some kind of cement on the wall. Not sure why.

No doubt there are other pipes waiting to go. My question is how to best replace this piping on this particular area. If he cut that copper pipe are there compression fittings that would attach to a 1.5" pipe or is it best to solder a new pipe to it or perhaps PVC right onto it. This way getting rid of all that corroded pipe and the 90 degree fitting, etc. I just don't know the best way to approach it.
 
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Old 07-25-19, 11:03 AM
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The problem with pipe that corrodes is it's just not sound for attaching anything to. You need to cut back until you get to good, solid pipe... which you probably can't do because of the wall in the way. You can try carefully cutting off the bad end of the copper and use a Fernco (rubber boot) to attach some PVC. With pipe in that bad shape you may not be able to tighten the clamps enough to get it to seal without crushing the pipe. If you can squeeze the copper pipe and crush it or change it's shape I wouldn't bother trying the Fernco.

Option #2 is if you can get the rotten copper pipe out of the elbow fitting you can screw in a new fitting. Work carefully as the copper pipe will likely tear apart before it unscrews. You'll then have to very carefully cut, pick and pry to remove the remains from the fitting without damaging the threads.

Option #3 is to cut the copper pipe on the other side of the wall and replace the 90 degree fitting with a PVC elbow and pipe with a Fernco rubber boot to connect to the copper pipe. You may have the same problem if the copper pipe is in too bad shape but hopefully it gets better the further you get from the rotten end.
 
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Old 07-25-19, 12:16 PM
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Thanks for that. The copper on the bedroom side, going into the stud wall seems to be in pretty good shape. Assuming it can get cut well and cleaned up well, would a slip joint connection seal better then a Fernco rubber boot? It will eventually be behind a wall when the drywall is replaced. After that it could be PVC'd all the way through the wall into the vanity, right up to the sink.
 
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Old 07-25-19, 04:54 PM
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You can not use a slip joint in a concealed location. A Fernco rubber boot is much more reliable.

Fernco rubber boots are not allowed by code in most applications but my inspectors are very liberal in allowing their use in repair situations. I've never had one fail so I don't hesitate using them. They are great for transitioning between pipes of slightly different size like adapting from copper to PVC.

The big drawback of the rubber boot in your application is that it won't offer the same amount of structural support for the end of the pipe. The flexible rubber coupling will make the end of your pipe a bit floppy. Adding a board or piece of plywood with a hole to support the end of the pipe might be a good idea if the wall can't provide support.
 
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Old 07-25-19, 06:53 PM
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That looks like a copper threaded right angle which means there is a nut facing the bathroom at the red arrow. You may be able to pull the pipe away from the wall in the bedroom and use a wrench or possibly a deep socket on the bathroom side.
 
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Old 07-26-19, 07:19 AM
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Do you mean use a wrench and try to unscrew that fitting.
 
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Old 07-26-19, 04:01 PM
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I think he means there should be another hex right next to the hex on the 90 degree fitting in your photo. The rotten pipe might have a hex with male threads that screws into the female threads of the 90 degree fitting. I don't see it in your photos though so I think it's just a simple, straight pipe nipple which has male thread on both ends and is intended to be tightened by grabbing with a pipe wrench. Certainly look for two hexes though as that could be a big help getting it apart.

So, I think you have this:


Hopefully you have a fitting like this screwed into the 90 degree fitting:
 
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Old 07-26-19, 06:50 PM
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I believe the stub is copper by the way it rotted and the green color. That would mean a fitting like Dane has displayed. That looks like drain cleaner has taken its toll on the pipe. Take a small hammer and tap on the bottom of the drain line in the closet. If it's rotted.... it will cave in.
 
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Old 07-27-19, 09:29 AM
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I believe there is a hex nut connecting the piece from the vanity side to the elbow. The problem with using that hex to unscrew it is getting a grip on it through the hole in the vanity wall. The pipe can't really be pulled out any from the bedroom side because the stud wall is preventing any more movement in that direction.

In a perfect world we would have unscrewed that pipe and replaced it with a nice shiny one like Dane has shown. Corrosion has kind of ruined that plan. I suppose making another attempt to unscrew it, is in order. Perhaps a strap wrench might be able to get a grab on that pipe without crushing it. If it can't be unscrewed, then I suspect cutting the copper pipe on the bedroom side is about the only solution, then use a fernco coupler or some such thing to connect PVC piping to that copper pipe.
 
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Old 07-28-19, 05:32 AM
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Do you know a truck or farm mechanic that would have large sockets? If so you can cut off as much pipe as possible. Then use the socket on the pipe fitting while a helper on the other side of the wall holds the 90 degree fitting. I would not try too hard to unscrew the fitting without someone holding the 90 on the other side as you risk twisting or tearing the pipe in the wall.
 
 

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