How can I tell cost of water used when taking a bath?


  #1  
Old 12-11-22, 07:08 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 693
Received 6 Upvotes on 6 Posts
How can I tell cost of water used when taking a bath?

Hey guys, our Autistic son has been advised by his therapist to take baths to help his anxiety/depression situation but water is very expensive here in NY so I am looking into finding out how much a bathtub filled with water will cost.

That will tell us how often he will be able to use the bathtub.

Our tub was brought years ago at Home Depot so we have no idea about size or model number. I have a friend who works at the local water dept. He said it costs $11 per cubic feet of water.

Our tub looks exactly like this one:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/American...-020/100479127

Any ideas please?
 
  #2  
Old 12-11-22, 07:44 AM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,139
Received 427 Upvotes on 380 Posts
Let's do some math...

The specs on the tub show the basin is 53" x 25.5" x 17.5" depth. That's 13.6 cubic feet of water.

Your cost of water is actually $11 per hundred cubic feet (ccf). It's often shortened to 'cubic feet'. So you're actually paying 11 cents per cubic foot. (Google tells me 1 cubic foot = 7.5 gallons by the way)

So to fill the tub, your water cost is about $1.50. You'll also have to pay to heat the water.

(and if anyone is checking my math, it says it's about 100 gallons to fill this tub. But Google tells me the average tub takes only 40-50 gallons... so maybe my math is wrong somewhere. So maybe it's only about half of what I stated above???)
 
mikehende voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 12-11-22, 07:57 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 693
Received 6 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Thanks! That's a lot of math for someone like me unfortunately.

Right, I got from google 1cubic feet is around 8 gallons. First, I have to wonder how my bud at the local water company can make such a BIG mistake, saying 11 per cu.ft when it's actually 11 per "hundred" cu.ft, is there some resource where I can confirm this part?

Next, I am thinking not the entire tub will be filled but filled to max under that triangular knob so if that is the case then how can I calculate how much water is actually in there please?




 
  #4  
Old 12-11-22, 08:12 AM
D
Group Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,813
Received 280 Upvotes on 221 Posts
I'm going to throw something out there.
You need to allow for water level rise when your son gets into the tub by the way. So if you are expecting a certain level before or after your son is in the tub.

Zoft can do the specific math if you need it but you just need to measure your water depth, width & length in inches. (Do this with the water level before your son gets in the tub.)

Length X width = square inches
Then X depth = cubic inches
That will tell you how many cubic inches of water you will need. Then divide that by 12 to get your cubic feet.

Anyone can correct MY math... lol
 
mikehende voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 12-11-22, 08:17 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 693
Received 6 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Thanks, will do.

So ZORFDT is correct on the cost being per 100 cu.ft:

For the Fiscal Year that began on July 1, 2022, the metered rate for water is $4.30 per 100 cubic feet, and the combined water and sewer charge is $11.13 per 100 cubic feet.
 
  #6  
Old 12-15-22, 06:38 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,580
Upvotes: 0
Received 287 Upvotes on 262 Posts
A "billable unit" of water in many cities is abbreviated "ccf" I think for "Roman numeral one hundred", "cubic" and "feet".

Your meter may measure finely enough to measure individual cubic feet where the third digit from the right is the "ccf". Or a mechanical meter may measure even finer where the right most digit wheel for individual cf moves uniformly as opposed to snapping to the next number. Then no need to compute cubic feet by measuring the tub.
 
mikehende voted this post useful.
  #7  
Old 12-16-22, 05:36 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,745
Received 1,210 Upvotes on 1,098 Posts
So now that the general amount of water is known comes the hard part, the energy needed to heat the water.

Now you have to do some research to find the type or WH you have (gas or elec) the efficiency and the cost of energy.

Or you can Google the question and get some estimates, it's not really all that much.
 
  #8  
Old 12-16-22, 02:21 PM
L
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
The easy way...I'm sure you have a meter. Fill the tub watching the meter. Our bills show useage in Cu. Meters. Figure the cost of heating from A>B if that matters. Probably minimal cost for the great job each bath does.
 
  #9  
Old 01-03-23, 09:17 AM
Y
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Oregon
Posts: 881
Received 24 Upvotes on 23 Posts
one cubic foot holds.... one gallon......
 
  #10  
Old 01-04-23, 02:58 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 440
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
"one cubic foot holds.... one gallon......"
I don't think so.

According to
Convert cubic feet of water to US gallons of water | water volume vs. weight conversion

1 cubic foot of water = 7.48 gallons
 
  #11  
Old 01-05-23, 06:21 AM
Y
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Oregon
Posts: 881
Received 24 Upvotes on 23 Posts
Yes, you are right. I am wrong.
 
  #12  
Old 01-06-23, 07:26 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,416
Received 66 Upvotes on 57 Posts
Your cost is based on the meter readings. As has been suggested, read the meter before and after the tub fill to get the amount.
 
CasualJoe voted this post useful.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: