Scotchbrite to fabric

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Old 11-11-16, 09:16 PM
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Scotchbrite to fabric

We purchased a large sleigh type bed with a fabric insert across the head board and would like to prep the fabric against stains from hair care produces. This is for a vacation rental property in a ski resort. I know nothing about protecting fabric. Any advice would be welcomed. Is it just as easy as spraying on a coating?
 
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Old 11-12-16, 03:36 AM
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I guess I meant ScotchGuard - was a little tired last night.
 
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Old 11-12-16, 05:08 AM
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Yeah, Scotchbrite may not give the results you want. Scotchgard is a good repellent of stains and liquids.
 
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Old 11-12-16, 05:12 AM
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Years ago I sprayed some type of protectant on some carpet [might have been scotch guard] The only thing I remember in the instructions was for the carpet to be clean - maybe the same for fabric ??
 
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Old 11-12-16, 05:18 AM
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There isn't much you need to do before SchotchGuarding. You can mask off the wood like you might for painting. Depending on the fabric you way want to hit it with a light layer and give it a minute to soak in to wet the fabric. Then hit it with another heavy coat to really soak in. If you try one heavy coat it may bead up and run on some fabrics but the first wetting coat works pretty well. It has a chemical smell so do it outside or plan on ventilating the room.

If you don't want to mask off the wood of the headboard have a rag or two handy. Spray the fabric and follow along and wipe the ScotchGuard off the wood with the rags.
 
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Old 11-12-16, 07:36 AM
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The fabric is probably already treated, but a spray of Scotchgard won't hurt. I don't think giving it a heavy spray will make it better since the finish won't allow it to soak in. It'll just sit on top. You need to spray it every now and then tho, because it'll wear off.
 
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Old 11-12-16, 03:02 PM
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Thanks guys, is there a way to tell if a fabric has been previously treated? Will water bead up on it?
 
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Old 11-12-16, 05:59 PM
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Sorry, when I say treated, I don't mean with Scotchgard, just a finish to help keep the fabric crisp and offers a little protection. Not sure if there's a way to tell tho, except that when it's washed, it looses that crispness.
 
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Old 11-12-16, 07:37 PM
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I would just go ahead and use some Scotchguard even if the material was already treated. Even a light coat will help the fabric last longer.
My wife was a seamstress years ago and the like new crispness is called sizing. Keeping the sizing intact and adding the spray will keep the fabric easy to clean and keep it from sagging.
 
 

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