What is this old floor


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Old 12-29-18, 09:09 AM
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What is this old floor

I recently bought this 20 year old home that had a newer floor laid sometime later, maybe 5 to 15 years ago. From above It looks like peel and stick vinyl but it is not. One photo was taken by the water heater looking at the edge of the current floor. It looks like about a half inch thick composite wood with a tongue and groove type edge with the vinyl tile attached to the top. I am assuming this was a product sold a few ago to go over old floors and raise the level to match other floors like engineered wood floors. There also looks to be some sort of cushion type layer directly beneath. It appears to be a styrofoam bead sandwiched between clear plastic sheeting. So this leads me to believe this top floor is floating. Does anyone recognize this product? What is it?

You can see from the one photo that the floor got wet and has raised the edges of this floor slightly. I want to lay another floor over this, preferably vinyl floor planks. If I have to remove this composite wood and vinyl floor first then I will have to add another layer of underlay to raise the height to match the other floors in the house. Is it possible to instead somehow sand this current level down to flat on these few raised edges? There are only a few that are raised in front of the refrigerator. The leak was minor and only affected a few seams. The remainder of the floor is in good shape.
 
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Old 12-29-18, 11:27 AM
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It's some type of square laminate flooring.

The Styrofoam you see is the underlayment. I used that once, believe the brand was Roberts, and it was a pretty good product.

If replacing it will need to be removed! It got wet and has curled, that is why laminates are not good for areas that have the chance of getting wet.
 
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Old 12-29-18, 11:47 AM
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Marq1 is right. Many people use a laminate floor as a quick, relatively cheap way to clean up the look of a floor. But they should NEVER be put in an area that might get wet. I consider laminate a temporary floor covering, even more so than carpet.
 
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Old 12-29-18, 01:33 PM
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I was hoping to be able to smooth those few minor lifts and put the interlocking vinyl planks over it. Otherwise the existing floor is smooth, flat, and in good shape. Understand the vinyl planks are considered waterproof. That should protect the composite board from future wetness.

What am I in for if I do this?
 
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Old 12-30-18, 05:58 AM
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What am I in for if I do this?
Your installing a floating flooring on top of a floating flooring, it's just not the right thing to do.

Removing that flooring will not be difficult, it;s not glued or nailed down.

Remember, doing a DIY project means your saving money, dont take shortcuts that give DIY projects a bad rap, do it right, that's why your here asking questions!
 
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Old 12-30-18, 06:10 AM
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So if I remove this composite floor what is the best underlayment to use? It needs to be about a half inch thick. I would like it to be waterproof. Although if I put the vinyl planks over it they are supposedly also waterproof. But I am not sure I want to take that chance again, I want this underlayment to be waterproof. What should I use?
 
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Old 12-30-18, 06:47 AM
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Not an expert - but just put in Vinyl Plank in a small bathroom.
Vinyl comes up to 8 mm (5/16) - and each manufacturer is different if they allow additional underlayment. Mine had it attached.
The T-Molding appears to be flexible to account for minor differences.
It can be put over a lot of stable surfaces - but another floating floor is not one of them.
 
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Old 12-30-18, 07:34 AM
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It needs to be about a half inch thick
Vinyl planking in itself is water resistant so it's a good choice!

No underlayment is going to be 1/2" thick, why is the thickness an issue?

If meeting up to other flooring heights there are a variety of moldings/transitions to meet thickness differences.

Every brand is different so you just need to read and compare!
 
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Old 12-30-18, 11:30 AM
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What is the reason for not being able to lay a floating floor over an existing floating floor?
 
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Old 12-30-18, 03:25 PM
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So If I google the question, can I install a floating floor over a floating floor I get!

It is generally not advisable to install flooring over a floating floor. Floating floors tend to disassemble easily since they are not attached to the subfloor.
But, a lot of people dont take good advice and end up with disasters!

You asked, we/I advised, let us know how it tuns out!
 
 

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