Drywall Axe


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Old 03-21-16, 12:16 AM
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Drywall Axe

Hey! Is anyone here using the Drywall Axe to fix drywalls ? I need feedback on the product.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 12:44 AM
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What do you mean you need feed back ? What kind of feedback ?

I use a T-square and a sheetrock knife.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 03:30 AM
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Is this what you are referring too? Drywall Axe | Adam Pauze Innovations
IMO it is just a gimmick and as Pete said a utility knife and T square or straight edge work fine.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 05:54 AM
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“Anyone who has cut drywall before knows that you can easily cut a four-foot piece with a square (tool), but an eight-foot is much more difficult, holding a knife in one hand and a measuring tape in the other,” the 20-year veteran of the trade said . . "


I've cut drywall before but never holding a utility knife in one hand and a measuring tape in another. Cutting an 8 foot piece is no more difficult than cutting a 4 foot piece. You can either do two cuts with a DW square or one cut with a fence - or freehand if you're good. I noticed that comments are closed on the site. I wonder why?

How does one take a chunk out of their arm cutting drywall?
 
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Old 03-21-16, 06:17 AM
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I'm not that good at it but I've had drywall hanger friends that were - they just set the knife at the end of the tape, hold the other end of the tape with their forefinger and zip down the sheet .... but then anything you do for a living requires you to learn all the little tricks so you can make money

They are good at math too! Most won't measure the long length but rather subtract what they need to. For example - a 120" piece is cutting 24" off of the 12' board.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 10:12 AM
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Took a chunk out of his arm cutting drywall? Never heard of someone so incompetent - I can't even imagine how one would do that.

I've not used the tool and I have no intention of buying one to try it.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 10:16 AM
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Took a chunk out of his arm cutting drywall
Had to have been a drunken incompetent novice - no other scenario makes sense!
 
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Old 03-21-16, 12:01 PM
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The tool is a drywall axe or I would call it a drywall hammer.
For me I always use screws with drywall so the magnetic nail holding would do me no good.
As far as chipping away poor fitting panel edges, I just use a utility knife or a surform tool.
I love tools but see no need for a drywall axe, and these can cost around $100 for a good one.

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Old 03-21-16, 12:07 PM
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I've always called that a drywall hatchet. I have one that is probably 30+ yrs old and it is my favorite hammer! Not sure if it's the balance or the larger head but I can drive more nails with it than I can with a regular or framing hammer before my tennis elbow starts hollering! I used to use it a lot before I got nail guns
 
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Old 03-21-16, 12:11 PM
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Bet he was using one of them when he cut a chunk out of his arm. That I could understand.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 08:21 PM
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I was talking about this drywall axe http://www.sparkinnovations.com/project/drywall-axe/. Anyone using them? Looks like me and @marksr are talking about the same product.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 09:34 PM
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they just set the knife at the end of the tape, hold the other end of the tape with their forefinger and zip down the sheet
Assuming you are not advertising, the product still looks useless. As quoted above, holding a utility knife against a tape measure works very good.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 11:08 PM
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I have seen pros that just sharpened the hook on the end of the tape measure instead of using a knife. Me I use a utility knife and and a metal straight edge. The square is probably quicker but I'm only a very occasional drywaller so a straight edge and marks work for me.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 02:46 AM
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One of my helpers is adept at using the sharpened end of his tape to mark, like Ray said. He makes it look easy. I use a 4' T square, thanks. If it is odd cuts, I lay it out and mark it with a pencil using the square, then use a multimaster to make the cuts. Straight cuts with a razor knife. I don't know of anyone who would use what the OP is suggesting.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 09:34 AM
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That is the tool to which I was referring in my earlier post (#6).
 
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Old 03-22-16, 11:16 PM
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I have used tape and knife before. Its just that I saw this product at the store. I was wondering if anyone is using them so that I could get some feedback. Looks like nobody has tried this product.
 
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Old 03-23-16, 02:20 AM
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Many of us [me included] like tools and try to have the proper tools for the job at hand but IMO that tool is more gimmick than anything else. Drywall hanging doesn't require precision cuts! Tape and mud cover every joint. That tool won't make drywall lay any flatter or easier to finish. I'm not even convinced that it will speed things up. I suspect there is a good reason none of us have tried that tool!
 
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Old 03-23-16, 02:58 AM
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Looks like nobody has tried this product.
It's just not a better mousetrap. Basic tools work better.
 
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Old 03-23-16, 07:54 AM
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I've seen those things around for years. On the shelves. I've never, ever seen one person using one, and I honestly have no idea what their purpose is. The hammer end could be used for drywall nails, but who uses them anymore?

What the heck would you use the axe end for? Please tell me you're not supposed to cut drywall with it? Maybe for chopping drywall out if you're removing it or gutting a wall? I've got no idea.
 
 

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