Why is there wood under bathroom tile?

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Old 06-15-16, 04:35 AM
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Why is there wood under bathroom tile?

I've been asked to do minor brushup on the tiles in the bathroom, and the person has this right on the bathtub edge:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]67342[/ATTACH]
[ATTACH=CONFIG]67343[/ATTACH]

Large size:
https://s20.postimg.org/ynjbvtmf1/WP_20160612_002_1.jpg
https://s20.postimg.org/sk1rbww59/WP...001[1].jpg

Underneath it looks like some sort of plywood or something. It's all rotten I think but still fairly sturdy. What should I do with it? Can I just get new tiles and lay them right over this or should I take the whole thing off? Should I but a new piece of plywood in place and will regular tile adhesive work?

Also they have this little portion of a tile that's fallen off. Is it better to peel off the whole tile or just cut a piece to fit that hole?

[ATTACH=CONFIG]67341[/ATTACH]

https://s20.postimg.org/xjz7jv1rx/WP...003[1].jpg

Thank you.
 
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Old 06-15-16, 05:14 AM
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It looks like the work was done improperly long ago. Tile should never be set over wood and especially so in a wet location. I'm afraid I would remove all the tile and start over. And, at that point I'd consider a mini remodel and consider putting down a more modern tile.

Unfortunately many people think that tile and grout is a waterproof barrier. It is not. Water seeps through grout even when it's not cracked. So in a tub shower area there needs to be a waterproof membrane underneath the tile and tile is often set on a cement based product like cement board or Hardie Backer which are highly water resistant.
 
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Old 06-15-16, 05:29 AM
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I think there is some empty space below that wood, that's probably why they put it there. Can I maybe just use regular cement board? Also how do I attach the board to the tub?
 
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Old 06-15-16, 05:44 AM
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Cement board isn't attached to the tub, it gets fastened to the studs in the wall and overlaps the lip on the edge of the tub. Once the tile is installed the slight gap between the tile and tub gets caulked. You'd likely have to remove more tile to reach the studs.
 
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Old 06-15-16, 05:57 AM
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Sorry, I'm not sure I understand. How would I attach the board to the stud if t's perpendicular to it?
 
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Old 06-15-16, 08:31 AM
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Sorry, I didn't look closely enough at the pics There still should be framing under that ledge, you need to expose it and then go from there.
 
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Old 06-15-16, 08:47 AM
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I see, if it's sitting on a frame then it should be fairly straight forward. I'll just nail the hardiebacker to it then lay the tile. But lastly, what can I do about the edge? Can I just douse it in silicone? By the edge I mean in the pic where you can see the layers, preferrable I'd like covered. Maybe silicone is a bit too transparent, Is there any kind of white, opaque caulk I can use?
 
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Old 06-15-16, 08:51 AM
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Tile stores and some home centers sell caulking that matches the grout, just have to get the appropriate color. If it's white grout, any siliconixed white caulk will do but if it's almond [or whatever] you want to match it to the grout.
 
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Old 06-15-16, 08:58 AM
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Allright thanks, I will be caulking it to the bathtub so white should do it.
 
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Old 06-15-16, 09:01 AM
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You also need to caulk to the wall, basically any angle where two planes meet. Grout is prone to crack in those areas.
 
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Old 06-15-16, 09:13 AM
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Right, didn't think of that. Whoever put the tiles before me didn't even bother with that, I might as well do it right. Thanks for you help.
 
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Old 06-15-16, 01:40 PM
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Tim,

The person who did the work nor you have a clue how to fix, (replace) this. You can't just install concrete backer and slap some tiles over it and think you're doing it right. The steps you've mentioned are wrong.

If this work is for someone who is gonna pay you, you should tell them to find someone qualified to do the work. If you're trying to just help them, we can give it a try. But from the looks of it, you will be ripping everything out and start fresh.

Let us know.

Jaz
 
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